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Clothesline Review: Danny Shane Bamboo Charcoal jersey $119

  • By Caley Fretz
  • Published Sep. 17, 2010
  • Updated Feb. 8, 2011 at 7:06 AM EST

A relative newcomer to the clothing scene, Danny Shane describes its clothing as ‘eco advanced,’ and dedicates itself to using fabrics made largely out of rapidly renewable or recyclable fabrics. The Turin model jerseys we tested are a 50/50 blend of microfiber poly rip-stop and bamboo white ash, a combination Danny Shane claims provides natural moisture wicking and UV protection without the use of chemicals. Keeping with their renewable theme, Danny Shane is also debuting bib shorts this fall made of 100 percent recycled nylon.

Fit for the Turin jersey edges slightly closer to European (skinny) cut than American (um… less skinny), without falling fully into either category. An invisible full-length zipper is a nice touch, and keeps with Danny Shane’s clean, retro styling. The three taper-cut pockets are well placed for easy access, and a fourth zippered pocket provides more security for important items. An elastic, grippy waist band keeps the jersey in place and the collar zips up snugly to the neck.

The fabric itself is very soft and feels high quality, and Danny Shane’s claims of excellent temperature regulation seem well founded. My first ride in the Turin jersey was a mid-afternoon out-and-back in the Rocky Mountains from Fraser to Empire, Colorado, heading up and over 11,307 foot Berthoud pass twice. The climb is about an hour in both directions, and takes you through a wide range of temperatures as you climb. Temperatures were in the low 80’s down low and barely over 60 up top, and I remained comfortable both up and down with only the addition of a pair of arm warmers for each descent.

As for claims of enhanced UV protection, I can’t say I’ve ever been burned through a cycling jersey and the Turin simply continued that underwhelming trend. So I guess we’ll just have to take the folks at Danny Shane on their word when it comes to the sun-blocking nature of their fabric.

The Turin is available at Dannyshane.com for $119; expensive, but not out of the normal range for high-quality jerseys.

FILED UNDER: Bikes and Tech / Clothesline / Reviews

Caley Fretz

Caley Fretz

Tech Editor Caley Fretz can usually be found chasing races along the backroads of Europe or testing bikes and gear in the mountains outside Boulder, Colorado. If you can't find him there, check the coffee shop across from VN World Headquarters.

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