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Eurobike Day One: The big brands can wait

  • By Nick Legan
  • Published Aug. 31, 2011
  • Updated Sep. 2, 2011 at 9:39 AM EDT

De Rosa has many flashy carbon bikes, but the styling of the Corum is simply beautiful. The TIG welded frame has an integrated headset and is offered in 30 sizes, both tradtional and sloping. Trialtir is the U.S. importer. Photo: Nick Legan © VeloNews

FRIEDRICHSHAFEN, Germany (VN) — The big brands can wait (there isn’t much new in that department anyway).

Today I focused on finding some sweet Italian steel bikes and stayed on the lookout for new products that captured my fancy.

Steel is in no way dead in the cycling industry. (Nor is aluminum for that matter, but I digress.)

It seems that the Italians have more nostalgia for it than any other cycling country. Maybe it’s because they hope consumers will pull out their checkbook when they get all misty-eyed about the good ol’ days of cycling. In any case, there were some beautiful examples on display in Friedrichshafen. Some are available in the U.S. and some aren’t.

Aluminum cranks for square taper bottom brackets seem to be holding strong as well. A lot of this must be due to the urban fixed gear craze and most of these cranks are made for single-chainring application. FSA honors Felice Gimondi with its take on a single-speed track crank. Phil Wood also has a beautifully polished aluminum crank for 2012.

Selle Italia’s Monolink system (which Caley Fretz reviewed last year) has found supporters in the industry. Ritchey, FSA and Deda all have posts for the saddles now. Unfortunately, the backing of the system by manufacturers doesn’t mean that consumers will buy in. But lower cost options will certainly make it easier for them to do so.

Many items are worth showing, but without proper testing don’t merit their own post. So I’ve included a few of them in this gallery.

FILED UNDER: Bikes and Tech / Eurobike / Quick Look TAGS:

Nick Legan

Nick Legan

After graduating from Indiana University with honors and a degree in French and journalism, Nick Legan jumped straight into wrenching at Pro Peloton bike shop in Boulder for a few years. Then, he began a seven-year stint in the professional ranks, most recently serving for RadioShack at the Tour de France and the Amgen Tour of California. He also worked for Garmin-Slipstream, CSC, Toyota-United, Health Net and Ofoto. Legan served as the VeloNews tech editor 2010-2012 before sliding across the line into public relations.

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