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Everything you wanted to know about riding and setting up Campagnolo’s Electronic Power Shift group

  • By Lennard Zinn
  • Published Nov. 8, 2011
  • Updated Nov. 9, 2011 at 9:21 AM EDT
Valentino Campagnolo presenting the fruits of many years of labor and dreaming. Photo: Lennard Zinn © VeloNews

Editor’s Note: After 3,400 words of Zinn wisdom, some folks simply want to know — which is better, Shimano Di2 or Campagnolo EPS? Here’s our editors’ best attempt at a shoot out:

Advantage Di2:

  • Quieter, smoother rear upshifts
  • Available sprint-shifter buttons allow better shifting in the drops
  • Slightly faster front upshift while shifting under full power out of the saddle
  • Smaller, removable battery can be hidden
  • Ultegra Di2 less expensive than either Campy group
  • Dura-Ace Di2 less expensive than Super Record (Record is said to be comparable to Dura-Ace Di2 pricing)
  • Accessory shifters for the bar tops, aero extension and aero base bar shifters currently available (Campy promises aero shifters in time for the Giro. No word on bar-top shifter plans).
  • Made in Japan

Advantage EPS:

  • Record and Super Record are each lighter than Dura-Ace Di2
  • Better shifting in thick gloves
  • More distinctive shift button clicks
  • Multiple rear shifts, including a full sweep of the cassette, possible with one push
  • Better shifting from the drops compared to Di2 with no sprint shifters.
  • Made in Italy

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Lennard Zinn

Lennard Zinn

Our longtime technical writer joined VeloNews in 1987. He is also a framebuilder, a former U.S. National Team rider, and author of many bicycle books, including Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance and Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance, as well as Zinn and the Art of Triathlon Bikes and Zinn's Cycling Primer: Maintenance Tips and Skill Building for Cyclists. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in physics from Colorado College. Readers can send brief technical questions to Ask LZ.

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