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Three for three: The VeloNews tech crew and the Selle Italia saddles they like

  • By Nick Legan
  • Published Nov. 11, 2011
The Selle Italia Turbomatic. Photo: Caley Fretz © VeloNews

Selle Italia SLR Team Edition By Caley Fretz Price: $267 The Scoop: carbon rails, minimalist padding, Lorica cover, Weight: 139 grams Pros: long nose, narrow rear, super light, strong enough for off-road use Cons: too narrow for those with wide sit bones More Info: selleitalia.com

The SLR is a narrow saddle with an almost perfectly flat top. Photo: Caley Fretz © VeloNews

The Selle Italia SLR is a minimalist racing saddle, with only a thin layer of Perfect Fit foam over its narrow 131mm wide, 275mm long shell. It is a favorite of the 20 Selle Italia-sponsored ProTeams and Pro Continental squads thanks to its low weight and good fit for narrow rear ends.

Like the Turbomatic, the SLR’s carbon rails are tall and ovalized for increased strength and stiffness. They attach directly to the shell (no elastomers here), and have a nice long clamping area for fore/aft adjustment.

The latest version of the SLR is a bit taller than before, with more distance between the saddle rails and the top of the saddle itself. I’ve been riding Selle Italia SLR’s for a decade. In fact my favorite saddle of all time is a perfectly broken-in SLR I bought in 2001, which always finds its way onto whatever bike I’m riding the most.

The latest generation changes the shape just a bit, adding a bit more padding all around and leveling the line from tip to tail. Where the old SLR used to dip a bit just forward of your sit bones, the whole top is now dead level. It still fits like an SLR, though, and I still find it incredibly comfortable.

With my narrow sit bones I tend to gravitate towards flat-top, narrow-shell saddles with minimal padding like the Fizik Arione and Prologo Nago. If you’ve found comfort with either, the SLR is likely to work for you as well. The SLR XC is the same shape but a bit more budget friendly at $180. It’s still light, too, at just 172 grams. More Info: selleitalia.com

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FILED UNDER: Bikes and Tech / Reviews TAGS: /

Nick Legan

Nick Legan

After graduating from Indiana University with honors and a degree in French and journalism, Nick Legan jumped straight into wrenching at Pro Peloton bike shop in Boulder for a few years. Then, he began a seven-year stint in the professional ranks, most recently serving for RadioShack at the Tour de France and the Amgen Tour of California. He also worked for Garmin-Slipstream, CSC, Toyota-United, Health Net and Ofoto. Legan served as the VeloNews tech editor 2010-2012 before sliding across the line into public relations.

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