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Clothesline review: Winter weather wonder wears

  • By Caley Fretz
  • Published Dec. 8, 2011
  • Updated Jan. 5, 2012 at 1:40 AM EDT
Fit on the Winter Jersey is tight, and designed for the riding position. Photo: Nick Legan © VeloNews.com

Pearl Izumi P.R.O Aero vest

MSRP: $110

There are four qualities important in a vest: wind resistance, water resistance, packability, and fit. The P.R.O. Aero vest passes all with flying colors. $110 is a bit ridiculous for a vest though; is this thing really worth it?

The Aero vest fits much tighter than most vests thanks to its stretchy material. Photo: Nick Legan © VeloNews.com

Depends on which of those four you place the most emphasis on. Fit is my first priority with a vest, an item I often only throw on for long descents. Long descents mean high speeds; high speeds mean any flappy bits are even more annoying than usual. As a pretty lean guy (let’s just call it “racer build”), I’m continuously at war with flappy clothing.

If you, like me, have a “racer build” and hate flappy clothing, the P.R.O Aero vest is worth every shiny penny. It uses a stretchy material and race-cut fit to drastically reduce flaps and folds. Even the collar is tapered to fit the neck better when in an aggressive position.

Amazingly, that stretchy fabric still provides entirely excellent wind and water protection. This isn’t a thermal vest: it’s just one thin layer, but for keeping wind out that’s all you need. It easily adds 10˚ to any garment setup. I add it to thick thermal gear to provide some wind protection, or to a jersey and shorts to make an early fall descent a bit more comfortable.

The P.R.O Aero vest balls up nice and tiny to be easily shoved in a pocket. Photo: Nick Legan © VeloNews.com

Packability is second to none. Some vests can get really tiny if you sit down and carefully fold the thing, but when wadded up in a fist they take up quite a bit of room. The Aero vest scrunches up tiny and stuffs easily in a pocket.

Speaking of pockets, the P.R.O. Aero vest doesn’t have any. That’s my only problem with it. But I’m always wearing something with pockets underneath, so it’s not really a big deal.

The scoop: super light, super packable, stretchy fabric eliminates flapping, excellent race-cut tailoring.

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FILED UNDER: Bikes and Tech / Clothesline / Reviews TAGS: / /

Caley Fretz

Caley Fretz

Tech Editor Caley Fretz can usually be found chasing races along the backroads of Europe or testing bikes and gear in the mountains outside Boulder, Colorado. If you can't find him there, check the coffee shop across from VN World Headquarters.

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