Menu

Giro New Road offers function and style for women on and off the bike

  • By Addie Levinsky
  • Published Apr. 29, 2014

Giro’s recently unveiled New Road line for women provides a one-size fits all answer to cycling clothing — it’s not standard roadie apparel, nor is it typical baggie wear for trail riding. While excellent for commuting, it goes beyond typical urban wear. Style and aesthetics are at the forefront of the New Road line, but Giro does not compromise function or performance to obtain these chic, yet casual pieces of cycling clothing.

This spring, Giro released a women’s collection as part of its New Road line, and as the days have grown longer, we’ve put the New Road wear to the test in the springtime breeze, covering a range of different outings on the bike. Having a line of clothing that can be translated to any ride, any time of day is great — and it’s made even better when you don’t have to think about changing for a post-ride coffee stop. Compiling a review with pieces from each of Giro’s four categories, we chose our favorite foundation piece, top, bottom, and outerwear to create an ensemble that fits for any cycle-centric occasion.

Foundation: Boy Undershort >> $70

The Boy Undershort is designed to be worn with other bottoms that do not have a chamois built in (such as the Mobility Short). Made with merino wool, the undershorts are incredibly soft and breathable. Giro’s Nycore fabric blends nylon with merino wool, providing durability and stretch. Our first impression of the Boy Undershort was nothing short of surprising; it may be an unassuming piece, but it almost immediately became a favorite from the collection. The undershorts can be used in place of a traditional pair of bibs or shorts for a base underneath mountain bike shorts, or they can simply replace underwear if you have a significant commute, or spend a lot of time on and off the bike throughout the day. Thinner than a traditional chamois, it still provides comfort in the saddle, but can be worn off the bike, remaining virtually unnoticeable.

Bottoms: Mobility Short >> $90

Tailored with precision and available in three neutral colors (black, gray, and navy), the Mobility Short is a warm weather essential. While similar to mountain bike shorts, the cut is a bit shorter and more form fitting, offering a flattering, feminine look. They are a perfect transition short for those who want to commute and not have to worry about bringing a change of clothes. The fabric is a mixture of polyester and cotton, and provides the stretch necessary for cycling apparel, but maintains the look of a casual summer short. Paired with the boy undershorts, these can be used for blistering days in the sun, whether on the bike for hours at a time or simply worn for running errands, or even going to work.

Top: CA Ride Jersey >> $150

Another piece in the collection using Giro’s Nycore fabric blend, this jersey provides utmost comfort. A unique feature of the CA Ride Jersey is the cover flap over the rear pockets. This flap ensures a clean aesthetic, and gives a bit of extra protection for anything stowed in the jersey pockets. Functionally, this jersey is excellent. Designed to taper in at the sides, the jersey is true, with a feminine, tailored look. We appreciated the full-length zipper, especially on hot days when having the option to unzip fully was necessary to stay cool. While the jersey is not fully disguised to look like a casual tee shirt, the seamless neckline gives it a refined look. It may not replace a normal top, especially in the workplace, but rolling up to happy hour or a coffee shop after a ride would be a great time to model this piece off the bike.

Outerwear: Wind Jacket >> $100

Perhaps one of the most indispensable pieces of cycling clothing, short or long distance, Giro’s Wind Jacket is a versatile piece that offers a layer for warmth, protection from the wind, and water resistance, lest you get caught in a downpour. It’s by far one of the lightest shells we have come across and because it collapses down to such a small size, no larger than an inner tube in fact, there’s no reason to leave home without it. The Wind Jacket seems like a simple nylon shell, but there are two elements that really stand out: the mesh panel of fabric in the back and the red stripe lining the zipper. The mesh on the back panel is great when commuting with a backpack, as it allows for breathability, while the front of the jacket provides protection from the elements. The red stripe lining the zipper panel provides a subtle pop of visibility; by revealing the zipper lining at sunrise or sunset, you can be sure motorists will see you, and you won’t have to worry about standing out like a street sign when the jacket is zipped up.

FILED UNDER: Bikes and Tech / Reviews TAGS:

Addie Levinsky

Addie Levinsky

Addie Levinsky joined VeloNews as an intern in January 2014 after studying philosophy at University of Colorado at Denver. She has a soft spot for handmade steel frames and is happiest when shredding flowy singletrack. Riding bikes, writing, and drinking too much coffee, not necessarily in that order, sums her up quite nicely.

Stay updated on all things VeloNews

Subscribe to the FREE VeloNews newsletter