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In the news: Federal government wants Armstrong under oath, this month

  • By VeloNews.com
  • Published Jun. 6, 2014
  • Updated Jun. 8, 2014 at 4:02 PM EST
Lance Armstrong is facing increasing financial pressure to settle multiple lawsuits before he is forced to testify under oath. Photo: Mandel Ngan | AFP

USA Today is reporting that the U.S. federal government wants Lance Armstrong, and several of his friends and colleagues, to testify this month in the government’s $100 million lawsuit against the disgraced cyclist.

Armstrong’s attorneys asked a judge to squash the scheduled depositions, claiming that it us unfair for them to testify before they receive discovery evidence requested but not yet received.

In addition to Armstrong, the government has dictated that four other witnesses testify in depositions: Armstrong friend John Korioth on June 12; Armstrong publicist Mark Higgins on June 13; Armstrong friend, and former Oakley employee Stephanie McIlvain, on June 26; and cycling coach Chris Carmichael, on June 27.

All four are on a list of potential witness in the government’s case against Armstrong, who stands accused of defrauding the government through his doping conspiracy when he rode on the U.S. Postal Service cycling team.

Among other potential witnesses the government listed in a court document filed this week, according to USA Today’s Brent Schrotenboer: Armstrong’s former girlfriend Sheryl Crow; ex-wife Kristin Armstrong; and several former U.S. Postal Service team officials and several former cycling teammates, including Frankie Andreu, George Hincapie, Tyler Hamilton, Kevin Livingston and Floyd Landis.

Acting as a government whistleblower, Landis originally filed the fraud lawsuit against Armstrong in 2010 before the government decided to join his case last year.

The suit accuses Armstrong of violating his sponsorship contract with the USPS by cheating in races with performance-enhancing drugs and blood transfusions.

In documents filed this week, USA Today reports that the government claims an exact amount of damages since June 10, 2000: $32,321,821.94 – a sum the government seeks to triple under the False Claims Act.

Armstrong also is scheduled to testify in yet another fraud lawsuit against him on June 12, a case brought by SCA Promotions, which is trying to recover bonuses it paid him for winning the Tour de France from 2002-2004.

Read the full story here.

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