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Velo magazine — February 2016

  • By Spencer Powlison
  • Published Jan. 12, 2016
  • Updated Jan. 12, 2016 at 2:03 PM EDT

Whether you choose to admit it or not, design is an intrinsic, important part of cycling. You like when your bike looks good and performs well. And when everything comes together like that, you’re more inspired to ride. So, the February issue of Velo magazine is The Design Issue.

It seems like small cycling companies keep popping out of the woodwork. Nathan Hurst writes that the today’s combination of ubiquitous social media, easy access to manufacturing facilities, and rapid prototyping creates fertile ground for new bike start-ups.

How do you design a thing that isn’t really a “thing?” Every year, Tour de France organizers create a route that will be the playing field for the sport’s biggest matches. Andrew Hood writes about how Christian Prudhomme and Thierry Gouvernou decide which cols to climb, which cities to finish in, and more.

Though big races like the Tour can keep us riveted, the WorldTour pros aren’t necessarily on the cutting edge of technology any longer, writes Caley Fretz. The industry has finally figured out that the average rider has different needs when they clip in for a weekend ride. But don’t kid yourself — those brand-new aero bikes that the peloton rolls on each summer are too tempting, too fascinating for us to ignore. That’s why our tech team tested two of the newest, most exotic bikes: Trek’s Madone and Specialized’s Venge. Find out which superbike won in the lab, the wind tunnel, and on the road.

Also in this issue, John Bradley talks to the founder of Rapha, Chris Case profiles inventor Richard Bryne, who created Speedplay pedals, and we tell the stories behind nine of cycling’s most iconic trophies.

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FILED UNDER: Magazine

Spencer Powlison

Spencer Powlison

When it comes to bike racing, Spencer is a jack-of-all-trades. He loves pinning on a number, whether it’s in a local criterium, a mountain bike enduro, a cyclocross national championship, or a gran fondo. Name any cycling discipline, and more likely than not, Spencer has ridden or raced it. He has been lucky enough to work in the bike industry for the majority of his adult life, from his time turning wrenches in a Vermont bike shop to his five-year tenure at the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA).

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