VeloNews.com » News http://velonews.competitor.com Competitive Cycling News, Race Results and Bike Reviews Fri, 27 May 2016 23:44:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.3.1 Phinney looks within, comes up big in Winston-Salem http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/phinney-looks-within-comes-up-big-in-winston-salem_407772 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/phinney-looks-within-comes-up-big-in-winston-salem_407772#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 22:56:03 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407772

Taylor Phinney said his win in U.S. Pro TT nationals was as much a mental test as a physical challenge. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Taylor Phinney's philosophy on bike racing has changed after his 2014 crash, which comes with both benefits and challenges.

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Taylor Phinney said his win in U.S. Pro TT nationals was as much a mental test as a physical challenge. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

WINSTON-SALEM, North Carolina (VN) — BMC Pro Team’s Taylor Phinney won his third U.S. Pro national time trial championship on Friday outside of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. In truth, he crushed it, besting Rally Cycling’s Tom Zirbel — a former national TT champion — by well over a minute. But to hear Phinney tell the story, the 48km out-and-back course was as much a battle of the mind as one of the legs.

“At the turnaround, I thought I was having my worst day ever,” Phinney confided when greeted by teammate Brent Bookwalter after the race. “Truly. The worst. Ever.”

The race marked Phinney’s first return to nationals since a disastrous outing in 2014, when the 25-year-old Boulder, Colorado native badly broke his left leg on a descent of Chattanooga’s Lookout Mountain. Since the accident, he’s become more introspective, which, for a pro cyclist, comes with both pros and cons.

“That was just the weirdest mind game,” Phinney said of Friday’s race against the clock. As I was doing my warm-up, I was thinking, ‘I don’t really feel very good.’ But you sort of push through that and you think, ‘Don’t listen to yourself, it’s 7:45 in the morning, and warm-ups are there for a reason.’ I started out pretty conservatively, and I was feeling good at first. But then, by the first turn I was already thinking, ‘Oh man, this is a lot more painful than I want it to be right now.’

It was then that the doubts set in.

“Honestly going into the turnaround on the second lap, I just felt like I was soft pedaling. I had completely given up. That’s what I felt. But then I was like, ‘What are you doing man? Go for it!’ It’s the strangest thing. I can go from being extremely confident to having zero confidence all in the same hour. Coming through the finish, I was pretty sure that I’d won. But 15 minutes before that, I was completely sure that I was off the podium.”

There’s little question that Phinney is more caught up in his mind these days, but he’s the first to tell you that he wouldn’t have it any other way.

“That accident helped me to broaden my horizons so much,” he said. “I’m truly grateful for the experience. It’s given me a completely different outlook on what I’m doing in life. It’s added a lot of clarity to why I ride my bike, but it’s also made me ask a lot of questions.

“I think that professional cycling — racing a bike — is a great teacher,” he explained. “There are a lot of really intense lessons you learn, about yourself, about your mind, about your body. I love that I know how my body works and how to take care of my body. I learned all of these things from professional cycling, and I wasn’t really aware of all of this before my accident, you know? I got into racing a bike because I was really good at it. It was something I could be quote-unquote ‘successful’ at. But now I’ve been spending a lot of time challenging that idea of success and what success even really means. So that’s kind of the journey that I’m on right now.”

At present, success — on the bike at least — means one thing only for Phinney: Rio.

“Since the crash the biggest thing that I’ve been focused on in my own mind is the Olympics. And I see the national championships as a stepping-stone to the goal of qualifying and preparing for the Olympics. So while I’m a lot more relaxed about the national championships than I was a couple years ago, I was here to win.”

And win he did. Asked if another year in the Stars and Stripes will help him lock down an Olympic berth, Phinney smiles broadly.

“It definitely won’t hurt. It’s a discretionary selection, so I’m not locked in yet, but I think this win was a really important step. I’ll put my proposal in, along with everybody else and hopefully I’ll get a spot. They announce the team in the middle of June.”

In the meantime, the BMC rider will continue working to recover his strength. He still goes to physical therapy two to three times a week, and while he’s experiencing success in short bursts, his racing calendar remains necessarily limited.

“I was initially going to try to do the Giro this year, but based on the recovery level of my leg — the strength of my left leg compared to my right leg — a three-week stage race just still seems a little bit premature. I’m trying to get on the Tour de Suisse roster, but that’ll be up to the team.

“Even though I have a slightly less powerful left leg, I feel very much stronger mentally. And I think that’s the thing that really matters.”

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With broken rib, Kruijswijk’s Giro in doubt http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/kruijswijk-suffers-broken-rib-giro-future-in-doubt_407774 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/kruijswijk-suffers-broken-rib-giro-future-in-doubt_407774#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 22:41:12 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407774

Giro leader Steven Kruijswijk struggled with his bike after crashing in stage 19. Photo: Giro d'Italia

X-rays reveal that Kruijswijk fractured a rib in his spectacular crash in the Giro d'Italia's stage 19. It's uncertain if he will continue

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Giro leader Steven Kruijswijk struggled with his bike after crashing in stage 19. Photo: Giro d'Italia

RISOUL, France (AFP) — Dutchman Steven Kruijswijk suffered a broken rib in a crash during the Giro d’Italia on Friday, his LottoNL – Jumbo team said.

The 28-year-old had started the day in the race leader’s pink jersey but suffered a spectacular head-over-heels fall on the rapid descent of the Colle dell’Agnello.

That cost him a couple of minutes and eventually the race lead as he struggled to the finish, with blood dripping from his elbow. After the race he was taken to the hospital in Briancon by ambulance with injuries to his elbow, knee, and ankle.

He underwent X-rays where the rib fracture was discovered. “[Kruijswijk] has a small rib fracture and is struggling with pains in his foot and side. New update, tomorrow morning,” said his team on Twitter.

Saturday’s penultimate stage is a tough one in the mountains with three peaks at over 2,000 meters (6,562 feet) to scale.

Kruijswijk is third overall, just over a minute behind race leader Esteban Chaves.

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Gallery: Phinney and Small win big at TT nationals http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/gallery/gallery-phinney-and-small-win-big-at-tt-nationals_407752 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/gallery/gallery-phinney-and-small-win-big-at-tt-nationals_407752#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 22:06:32 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407752

Phinney won the U.S. Pro time trial for the third time. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Taylor Phinney convincingly won U.S. time trial nationals, and Carmen Small proved fastest of the women in Winston-Salem.

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Phinney won the U.S. Pro time trial for the third time. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

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Nibali animates decaffeinated Giro http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/nibali-gives-giro-exclamation-mark-it-needed_407735 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/nibali-gives-giro-exclamation-mark-it-needed_407735#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 20:03:56 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407735

The Vincenzo Nibali of old emerged on the climbs of the Giro's stage 20, erasing doubt and criticism that had been building. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

Vincenzo Nibali ripped apart the Giro d'Italia in stage 20, winning the day and coming within striking distance of the maglia rosa.

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The Vincenzo Nibali of old emerged on the climbs of the Giro's stage 20, erasing doubt and criticism that had been building. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

If it was the fourth quarter of a football game, Vincenzo Nibali threw the cycling equivalent of a Hail Mary, connecting the long bomb to put him right on the goal line with seconds to play.

The Shark’s daring attack blew open a somewhat blocked, back-and-forth Giro d’Italia, and single-handedly turned the race upside.

In a nation known for its exuberance, its passion, and its color, this Giro was a little bit decaffeinated, at least for local tastes. Sure, the racing has been intense, but the 99th Giro was lacking those larger-than-life moments that make the Italian grand tour so endearing.

Well, Friday’s two-climb smasher over the Alps changed all that. It seemed to pack two weeks of headlines into one action-packed stage. The GC changed, the pink jersey crashed, another favorite went out in a harrowing crash, (Katusha’s Ilnur Zakarin), and the Giro saw a fresh-faced Esteban Chaves don the pink jersey — only the third Colombian to do so. All stories in their own right.

The instigator: Nibali, who else?

Just 48 hours ago, Astana’s Italian champ was in “crisis.” He couldn’t understand — or rather, the Italian media didn’t understand why he wasn’t smashing this Giro. With all three of the “big four” — Nairo Quintana, Chris Froome and Alberto Contador — steering clear of Italy this month, everyone thought Nibali would win in a cakewalk. There were whispers of a mysterious ailment. A pact against Astana. Even the suggestion that Nibali was past his sell-by date. Starting Friday’s stage in fourth at 4:43, most had already written him off.

Not Astana sport director Giuseppe Martinelli, who said this yesterday morning: “We still believe in Vincenzo. Great riders can do great things. That is what sets apart true champions.”

Already a winner of all three grand tours, Nibali reconfirmed Friday why he’s the best Italian rider since the troubled Marco Pantani in the 1990s. With a long-distance attack that blew up the race, he won the stage, and clawed within 44 seconds of the pink jersey.

“I couldn’t express myself in this Giro,” Nibali said, as if he were an artist. “I just didn’t have my normal strength in the Dolomites. Today I felt like myself again.”

As the stage unfolded across the Cima Coppi and the French Alps, something special started to happen. A big group pulled clear, and the pack was setting a very high tempo as it worked up the 21km summit. Astana was like a pack of wolves trying separate a weak member of the herd for a meal. Nibali noticed that Kruijswijk was surprisingly struggling up the slopes of the day’s first monster.

“I noticed that Kruijswijk was not going very well, so I decided to accelerate,” Nibali said. “Initially, I was only thinking about the stage win because I was far back on the GC, but 3km from the top [Col dell’Agnello], I saw a lot of riders suffering, and I decided to attack.”

Chaves and Kruijswijk followed, but Kruijswijk swerved wide over the top of the snow-bound pass — either because he was cross-eyed from the effort or perhaps he was eating something — and flipped over his handlebars into a snow bank.

When the race is on, no one waits. Nibali later claimed he did not realize what had happened to Kruijswijk, only that he wasn’t there. The Dutchman never recovered, and the Giro was suddenly a very different race.

Astana played the perfect tactic, and called Michele Scarponi out of the breakaway, who sat up, forfeiting his chance for the stage win, and helped pace Nibali to the base of the 10-switchback climb at Risoul. Nibali kept pouring it on, dropped Chaves, and won his first stage of this Giro.

Nibali now has major momentum going into Saturday’s 134km, four-climb decider with the pink jersey still in play. With the day’s first Cat. 1 summit coming in the opening 20km, it will be a battle all the way to the line.

“I’ve always said that a grand tour is raced until the final day,” Nibali said. “Until the final day, anything can happen.”

Tomorrow the Giro will be above the fold in La Gazzetta dello Sport, with this headline (or something very close): “Grande Nibali!”

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When a domestique wins a grand tour http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/giro-ditalia/how-a-domestique-can-win-a-grand-tour_407716 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/giro-ditalia/how-a-domestique-can-win-a-grand-tour_407716#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 19:20:34 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407716

Michele Scaroni led the group that included Vincenzo Nibali and the race favorites up the last 200 meters of the Passo Giau as fans roared. Photo: Iri Greco / BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

Vincenzo Nibali got the glory with a win in the Giro's stage 20, but his teammate, Michele Scarponi might be the day's MVP.

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Michele Scaroni led the group that included Vincenzo Nibali and the race favorites up the last 200 meters of the Passo Giau as fans roared. Photo: Iri Greco / BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

Michele Scarponi might just win this Giro. Not for himself, of course, but for Vincenzo Nibali.

Nibali collapsed on his handlebars at the finish line in Risoul on Friday, a towel to his face, his shoulders rocking with sobs. It was his first stage win of the race, redemption after a second week that left him on the back foot and embarrassed by his form. The victory came off the wheel of Scarponi, where Nibali has spent so much of this Giro. When Nibali finally looked up he spoke with RAI, the Italian broadcaster, about his Astana teammate.

“Michele was truly great,” he said, still emotional. “In this Giro d’Italia, he has sat beside me and believed in me until the end.”

On Friday, just a few days after Nibali threatened to drop out of this Giro, Scarponi set the Shark up for his first successful attack.

There was a plan, and it was executed. Scarponi made his way into the breakaway, which took nearly two hours to establish (an indication that everyone wanted to be in it). He was the first to cross the Cima Coppi, the highest point of the Giro, minutes ahead of the GC leaders.

Sitting comfortably in the break, Scarponi was protected from the accelerations of the GC group behind, which shredded the main field down to just Nibali, Esteban Chaves, and the maglia rosa Stephen Kruijswijk. Alejandro Valverde, third on Friday morning, was gone; the pundits say he’s no good at altitude, but all we really know he was no good on Friday.

Then Kruisjwijk crashed on the descent, and the day’s tactics solidified.

They say teams win grand tours. There are exceptions to this rule, but there’s no doubt that a team can lose a grand tour. Kruijswijk’s lack of teammates following his nasty snowbank tumble forced him to chase hard, alone, on the descent and then across a small valley, with only a bit of help from Etixx – Quick-Step. The team had no rider in the breakaway, ready to wait for the leader. Nibali had Scarponi, and Chaves’s teammate Ruben Plaza deserves special mention as well. As a result, Kruijswijk arrived at the final climb to Risoul with a 20-minute full-gas effort already in his legs. In hindsight, he didn’t stand a chance.

Ahead, Scarponi rolled a few turns with Lotto – Soudal’s Maxime Monfort, then sat up. He would have won the stage, almost without question. He’s already shown his form this week, finishing fifth in the uphill time trial (23 places ahead of Nibali, by the way). But the 37-year-old rolled slowly back to his team car, he stopped, grabbed a few bottles and a snack and prepared himself for the arrival of his leader.

The final tactics were simple. Scarponi pulled for half the climb, extending the group’s lead over Kruijswijk from a minute to more than three. When he swung off, job done, Nibali was already level on time with Kruijswijk, unlikely to factor with a crash-battered body. Thanks to in large part to Scarponi, the Giro is a two-horse race heading into the final mountain stage.

If Nibali manages to overhaul Esteban Chaves to take pink, he’ll have his Italian teammate to thank for the victory, and for encouraging him to stay in the Giro when things got rough.

Scarponi is a grand tour winner himself, thanks to the disqualification of Alberto Contador’s 2011 Giro ride. The 37-year-old was connected (via the nicknames Zapatero and Il Presidente) to Eufemianio Fuentes in 2007 and to Michele Ferrari in 2012, the latter of which resulted in a three-month ban. These days, though, he’s better-known within the peloton as a comedian. He’s quirky, certainly the only rider I’m aware of who trains with a parrot. Its name is Frankie.

Parrots aside, no domestique has had a greater impact on this Giro d’Italia. Scarponi saved Nibali half a dozen times already this Giro. A few seconds on stage 6, another few on stage 16. The importance of that time is now brought into focus, as Nibali sits only 44 seconds off the maglia rosa.

Saturday will be the final test. If Nibali passes — if he can take 44 seconds on Chavez and the final maglia rosa — he’ll have Scarponi to thank.

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Chaves, Orica ready to realize pink jersey dreams http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/chaves-orica-ready-to-realize-pink-jersey-dreams_407713 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/chaves-orica-ready-to-realize-pink-jersey-dreams_407713#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 19:02:18 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407713

Esteban Chaves couldn't hang on for a stage win Friday, but he did seize the overall Giro d'Italia lead. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

With the pink jersey in hand, Esteban Chaves is mustering his Orica – GreenEdge team for a pivotal day in the mountains Saturday.

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Esteban Chaves couldn't hang on for a stage win Friday, but he did seize the overall Giro d'Italia lead. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

RISOUL, FRANCE (VN) – Esteban Chaves is readying for an almighty scrap for overall victory at the Giro d’Italia in Saturday’s final mountain stage after taking the race lead on Friday.

While the Giro finishes on Sunday with the 163km stage 21 from Cuneo to Torino, the fight for the overall winner’s maglia rosa will be decided in the Alps on Saturday.

The 134km stage 20 from Guillestre to Sant’Anna di Vinadio is the last mountain stage of the Giro and includes four major categorized climbs — the category 1 Col de Vars, Col de la Bonnette, and Colle della Lombarda, as well as the third category ascent to the finish line.

After Friday’s stage 19, 162km from Pinerolo to Risoul in France, Orica – GreenEdge’s Chaves is now first overall after starting the day placed second. Now second at 44 seconds is Italian Vincenzo Nibali (Astana), who won on Friday, followed at 1 minute, 5 seconds by Dutchman Steven Kruijswijk (LottoNL – Jumbo) who lost first place. Spaniard Alejandro Valverde is also in the fray, sitting fourth at 1 minutes 48 seconds.

Chaves, who finished third in Friday’s stage at 53 seconds to Nibali and two seconds behind Spaniard Mikel Nieve (Sky), is wary of the tight margins with his rivals.

“Tomorrow is the toughest stage for sure,” Chaves said after Friday’s sensational stage. “The last stage [in the mountains] always is, and now there are the riders within a minute.”

However, the Colombian from Bogota is certainly not daunted by the opportunity that awaits him, that being to win his first grand tour and also become the second Colombian to ever win the Giro — the first being Nairo Quintana (Movistar) who won the race in 2014.

An overall victory by Chaves would also mark the first grand tour win by an Australian team.

“Today we raced to attack,” Chaves, 26, continued. “Tomorrow, we can ride to defend the jersey and so stay more calm, with our feet on the ground. It’s also a short stage.

“If we take the jersey home, I’ll be ‘bellissimo.’ If not, we’ll have done our very best.”

Chaves is also wanting to share the opportunity and its outcome with those closest to him.

“I hope this dream can come true,” Chaves said. “This means a lot of work for my team, but we always believed we could do this. Thanks to my family and all who were involved and who have helped me in the difficult moments. This jersey shows that dreams can true.”

On Friday, Chaves was quick, as always, to thank the riders on his Australian team. He began his press conference by saying, “Before talking about the stage today [it] was a very special day for me and my country. The team worked incredibly; all of them were great.”

On the Col Dell’Agnello, his teammates were very active, first with a surge by Australian Damien Howsen and then Spaniard Amets Txurruka as they led the overall contenders’ group, isolating Kruijswijk before the summit and distancing Valverde.

Ruben Plaza also played a critical role for Chaves as the stage exploded. He dropped back to join Chaves following Kruijswijk’s crash. Nibali also had a teammate in front drop back to help him, Italian Michele Scarponi.

“We attacked early but had to do to gain time,” said Chaves who started the day three minutes down on Kruijswijk overall. “I struggled to stay with Nibali on the descent, but I stayed with him. I’m sorry for for Kruijswijk who crashed. I didn’t see it, but heard [about it] on the radio. At the end of the day Nibali was the strongest, and I couldn’t stay with him.”

Orica head sport director Matt White was all thumbs up for the outcome of Friday’s stage. But he is far from in celebration mode with Saturday’s crucial stage to come.

“We wanted to get someone in the breakaway today that’s for sure,” said White. “After [Thursday’s] stage we knew the racing was going to be very aggressive today with lots of teams looking to get into the break which didn’t end up forming until 75 kilometers in.

“It made the difference for us having Plaza up the road because he was so important for Esteban in the final third of the stage when the chasers looked to be getting closer.

“Nibali was very strong on the final climb. But Esteban rode really well and measured his rhythm and his tempo all the way to the finish.”

“Tomorrow is going to be a very difficult stage and we are going to have to be on our guard all the time, but we have one more hard day to go and we are really happy to be in this position.”

More about Esteban Chaves >>

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Results: 2016 U.S. Pro time trial national championships http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/race-results/results-u-s-pro-time-trial-national-championships_407750 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/race-results/results-u-s-pro-time-trial-national-championships_407750#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 18:51:51 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407750 Taylor Phinney returns to glory with third national championship title as Carmen Small surprises pre-race favorites to win.

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  • 1. Taylor Phinney, Bmc Racing Team, in 1:02:45.71
  • 2. Thomas Zirbel, Rally Cycling, at 1:09.36
  • 3. Alexey Vermeulen, Team Lotto Nl – Jumbo, at 1:12.14
  • 4. Brent Bookwalter, Bmc Racing Team, at 1:35.48
  • 5. Evan Huffman, Rally Cycling, at 1:51.55
  • 6. Mac Brennan, Holowesko | Citadel Racing Team P/b Hincapie Racing, at 2:13.56
  • 7. Benjamin Wolfe, Jelly Belly P/b Maxxis, at 2:32.82
  • 8. David Williams, Astellas Cycling Team, at 2:47.94
  • 9. Gregory Daniel, Axeon Hagens Berman, at 2:58.71
  • 10. Eamon Franck, Astellas Cycling Team, at 3:40.45
  • 11. Robin Carpenter, Holowesko | Citadel Racing Team P/b Hincapie Racing, at 3:40.84
  • 12. Taylor Shelden, Jelly Belly P/b Maxxis, at 5:19.17
  • 13. Michael Olheiser, Lupus Racing Team, at 5:49.07
  • 14. Bryan Lewis, Lupus Racing Team, at 7:21.71
  • 15. Julian Kyer, Elevate Pro Cycling Team, at 7:41.18
  • 16. Cory Greenberg, Cylance-Cannondale Pro Cycling P/b Incycle, at 8:26.57
  • DNF Johnathan Freter, Astellas Cycling Team
  • DSQ Daniel Eaton, Unitedhealthcare
  • DNS Joshua Berry, Jelly Belly P/b Maxxis
  • DNS Brendan Rhim, Holowesko | Citadel Racing Team P/b Hincapie Racing

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Kruijswijk: I made a stupid mistake http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/kruijswijks-team-say-giro-win-still-possible_407709 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/kruijswijks-team-say-giro-win-still-possible_407709#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 18:16:27 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407709

Provided Steven Kruijswijk is not injured from his fall in the Giro's stage 19, LottoNL hopes he can attack the final day in the mountains in an effort to retake the pink jersey. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

Steven Kruijswijk rues an error while descending a mountain pass in stage 19 that may have lost him the Giro d'Italia overall.

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Provided Steven Kruijswijk is not injured from his fall in the Giro's stage 19, LottoNL hopes he can attack the final day in the mountains in an effort to retake the pink jersey. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

RISOUL, France (VN) — Steven Kruijswijk crashed into a snow bank, fell on his back and lost the Giro d’Italia race lead Friday, but his LottoNL – Jumbo is hopeful that he can take back the pink jersey and win the race Sunday.

The Dutchman started stage 19 with a three-minute lead over Orica – GreenEdge’s Esteban Chaves, but lost 4:54 because of his crash and slipped to third overall at 1:05. Chaves now leads the race by 44 seconds over Vincenzo Nibali (Astana) and 1:05 to Kruijswijk.

“Is the Giro over? No,” sport director Addy Engels said at the team’s hotel. “Even in the best situation, if we would’ve had the pink jersey, I would’ve also answered the Giro is over tomorrow evening. That’s also my answer now. But of course, the odds now are not in our favor.”

Dutch riders have won the Tour de France and the Vuelta a España twice, but never the Giro d’Italia. Insiders said this morning that it would be unlikely that Kruijswijk would lose the race lead in the two mountain days before the Torino finish. However, right after Kruijswijk crossed the Colle dell’Agnello and into France, his race lead fell apart.

“I was on my limits on the top, I wanted to eat and drink something,” he said. “I was following the rest, I made a stupid steering mistake, and I ended up in the snow bank. The fall wasn’t that bad itself, but my bike was a mess and I couldn’t ride on with it, and I lost the leaders, and then you know it’s all over.”

He went to the hospital for X-rays after finishing the race, but if everything proves to be fine then the Dutch WorldTour team hopes that he can rebound in the final mountain stage.

The Giro’s stage 20 races mostly through France on Saturday. It covers the Col de la Bonette and the Colle della Lombarda to enter Italy, where the final kicker to the Sant’Anna di Vinadio awaits.

“Tomorrow is another hard today, like today. In the end, Nibali was able to leave Chaves behind with almost one minute today, so things are open,” Engels added. “If he can recover … Until he crashed, he was one of the best riders in the race. If the injuries are not too bad and if he can recover, then maybe we can strike back tomorrow.”

Overnight, the 28-year-old will need to recover his spirits as well.

“I feel that I’ve hurt my ribs, my back. After the finish, I felt it really bad, my morale is broken,” Kruijswijk said. “Still in third? Yeah, but I lost the Giro here.”

UPDATE: Late on Friday, LottoNL – Jumbo tweeted that Kruijswijk suffered a fractured rib.

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Kruijswijk crumbles, Nibali wins Giro stage 19 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/giro-ditalia/kruijswijk-crumbles-nibali-wins-giro-stage-19_407645 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/giro-ditalia/kruijswijk-crumbles-nibali-wins-giro-stage-19_407645#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 15:07:49 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407645

Vincenzo Nibali rode brilliantly in stage 19, winning the day and moving up in the Giro overall. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

The Giro d'Italia's brutal stage 19 sees Vincenzo Nibali earn redemption with a win, while Esteban Chaves takes the overall race lead.

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Vincenzo Nibali rode brilliantly in stage 19, winning the day and moving up in the Giro overall. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

The Colle dell’Agnello, the Giro’s highest mountain pass, lived up to its billing as the Cima Coppi Friday. It offered a springboard for Vincenzo Nibali to redeem himself with a stage win, but also crushed Steven Kruijswijk’s pink jersey dreams. The LottoNL – Jumbo Dutchman crashed early on the descent, while Nibali pushed on with Orica – GreenEdge’s Esteban Chaves. Although the Colombian couldn’t match the Astana leader, who won the 162-kilometer race to Risoul, France, he took the maglia rosa from Kruijswijk with a third-place finish.

“I’ve won by rage today,” Nibali said. “It hasn’t been easy to handle everything that has happened over the past few days. I dedicate this victory to Rosario [a young pupil of his who died two weeks ago]. I’m very happy. It’s been a terribly hard stage.”

Stage 19, top 10

  • 1. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, in 4:19:54
  • 2. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, at :51
  • 3. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at :53
  • 4. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 1:02
  • 5. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, at 2:14
  • 6. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:14
  • 7. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:14
  • 8. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:43
  • 9. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, at 2:51
  • 10. Hubert DUPONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:51

 

Top-three overall

  • 1. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, in 78:14:20
  • 2. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :44
  • 3. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:05
  • 4. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, in +1:48
  • 5. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, at 3:59
  • 6. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 7:53
  • 7. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 9:34
  • 8. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 12:18
  • 9. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, at 13:19
  • 10. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 14:11

 
A large breakaway group went away early in the 162-kilometer stage, and as the Colle dell’Agnello began to climb, 2011 Giro winner Michele Scarponi and Lampre – Merida’s Diego Ulissi set off in the lead. Grinding a huge gear, the Astana rider distanced his Italian compatriot and rode to the top of the Cima Coppi alone.

Behind, Orica – GreenEdge was keen to test Kruijswijk, sending several riders to the front, riding a blistering pace for Chaves with 60km to go. Though the efforts shattered the field, they didn’t unhitch Kruijswijk. Nibali was distanced, but he chased back when the pace ebbed.

Close to the top of the climb, Nibali found new life and went to the front to drive the pace. Over the top, it was just the Italian champ, Chaves, and Kruijswijk. Notably, Movistar’s Alejandro Valverde, who was one place ahead of Nibali in third at the start of the day, was dropped.

Disaster struck on the foggy upper slopes of the descent, where visibility was almost null. Kruijswijk overshot a left turn and catapulted into the waist-high snow banks lining the road. He lost valuable time to Chaves and Nibali as he tried to get his bike in working order, with help from the neutral service car. Later, on the sunny lower slopes, Kruijswijk finally got a new bike from his team car.

“I’ve lost the Giro,” he said after the race. “I made a mistake and suddenly I was in the snow. I wasn’t really hurt in the fall but the bike was damaged. Despite all my efforts I lost contact with the others. It hit me really hard.”

He wasn’t the only top rider to crash on the descent — Katusha’s Ilnur Zakarin was seen laying in a meadow on the side of the road for several minutes, receiving medical attention. He later abandoned with a broken clavicle and shoulder blade after starting the day in fifth overall.

Chaves and Nibali found a valuable ally as they descended into the bright valley, linking up with Orica’s Rueben Plaza. With about 34km left, they looked to have a 1:16 lead on the pink jersey. They also picked up Sky’s Nicolas Roche on the long descent.

Under team orders, Scarponi stopped, abandoning his personal ambitions to wait for Nibali’s group. Lotto – Soudal’s Maxime Monfort carried on as stage leader with 33km to go. With Scarponi driving lead GC group, Nibali, Chaves, and company caught Monfort with about 10km to go, early on the 12.85 ascent to the finish in Risoul.

Early on the slopes of the final climb, Kruijswijk looked ragged. Valverde, on the other hand, found a second wind and was chasing only one minute behind his GC rivals.

With 5.5km to go, Nibali tested Chaves with an attack, distancing Sky’s Mikel Nieve and Ulissi, who had been riding with the overall favorites. At first, the Colombian had a reply, but then with a second move, Nibali got a gap. About three kilometers from the top, the Italian champ had stretched his lead to 17 seconds.

Nieve joined Chaves just before the final two kilometers. Their gap to Nibali was out to 25 seconds, and it would grow by another 26 seconds before the finish, where the Italian champ would collect his first win of the Giro. Chaves minimized time lost to Nibali to take the overall lead from Kruijswijk.

“I think it’s the hardest day of the race for me,” Chaves said. “Also it’s the most important — I took the maglia rosa. I’m really, really happy today. The teamwork — unbelievable, all the guys attacking the Angnello. I tried to follow Nibali, but he was stronger today.”

On Saturday, the new leader will face one final mountain test, a 134km race from Guillestre to Sant’Anna di Vinadio. Stage 20 features three category 1 climbs and a category 3 uphill finish. The Giro wraps up Sunday with a likely sprint finish in Torino, Italy.

Stage 19 results

  • 1. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, in 4:19:54
  • 2. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, at :51
  • 3. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at :53
  • 4. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 1:02
  • 5. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, at 2:14
  • 6. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:14
  • 7. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:14
  • 8. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:43
  • 9. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, at 2:51
  • 10. Hubert DUPONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:51
  • 11. Maxime MONFORT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:00
  • 12. Andre Fernando S. Martins CARDOSO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 3:07
  • 13. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:36
  • 14. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 3:45
  • 15. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 4:30
  • 16. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 4:54
  • 17. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, at 5:53
  • 18. Marcel WYSS, IAM CYCLING, at 5:59
  • 19. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 6:21
  • 20. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 6:22
  • 21. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 6:49
  • 22. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, at 7:26
  • 23. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, at 7:26
  • 24. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 7:55
  • 25. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 7:56
  • 26. Egor SILIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at 7:56
  • 27. Ian BOSWELL, TEAM SKY, at 8:27
  • 28. Hugo HOULE, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 9:05
  • 29. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, at 9:10
  • 30. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, at 9:10
  • 31. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 9:10
  • 32. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 9:10
  • 33. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 13:36
  • 34. Jesus HERNANDEZ BLAZQUEZ, TINKOFF, at 14:12
  • 35. Bakhtiyar KOZHATAYEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 14:22
  • 36. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 14:50
  • 37. Guillaume BONNAFOND, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 14:52
  • 38. Pawel POLJANSKI, TINKOFF, at 15:55
  • 39. José HERRADA LOPEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 16:37
  • 40. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 16:39
  • 41. Jose Joaquin ROJAS GIL, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 17:49
  • 42. Rory SUTHERLAND, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 17:49
  • 43. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 18:04
  • 44. Carlos VERONA QUINTANILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 18:04
  • 45. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, DIMENSION DATA, at 18:04
  • 46. Damien HOWSON, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 18:04
  • 47. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 18:46
  • 48. Amets TXURRUKA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 21:09
  • 49. Igor ANTON HERNANDEZ, DIMENSION DATA, at 21:09
  • 50. Andrey ZEITS, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 21:09
  • 51. Manuele MORI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 21:09
  • 52. Adam HANSEN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 21:09
  • 53. Eros CAPECCHI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 21:09
  • 54. Pavel KOCHETKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 21:09
  • 55. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, at 21:09
  • 56. Davide MALACARNE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 21:09
  • 57. Primož ROGLIC, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 21:09
  • 58. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 21:09
  • 59. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 21:09
  • 60. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 21:09
  • 61. Rein TAARAMAE, TEAM KATUSHA, at 21:09
  • 62. Davide FORMOLO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 21:09
  • 63. Riccardo ZOIDL, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 21:09
  • 64. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 21:09
  • 65. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, at 21:09
  • 66. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, at 21:09
  • 67. Bram TANKINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 21:09
  • 68. Benoît VAUGRENARD, FDJ, at 21:59
  • 69. Laurent DIDIER, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 22:51
  • 70. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 23:31
  • 71. Chad HAGA, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 23:31
  • 72. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, at 23:50
  • 73. Vegard Stake LAENGEN, IAM CYCLING, at 23:50
  • 74. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, at 25:03
  • 75. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 25:03
  • 76. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 25:06
  • 77. Christian KNEES, TEAM SKY, at 25:06
  • 78. Simone PETILLI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 25:06
  • 79. Aleksey RYBALKIN, GAZ, at 25:06
  • 80. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 25:06
  • 81. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, at 25:06
  • 82. Anton VOROBYEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 25:06
  • 83. Pieter SERRY, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 25:06
  • 84. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 25:06
  • 85. Martijn KEIZER, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 25:06
  • 86. Heinrich HAUSSLER, IAM CYCLING, at 25:06
  • 87. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, at 25:39
  • 88. Albert TIMMER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 25:54
  • 89. Viacheslav KUZNETSOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 26:34
  • 90. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 26:56
  • 91. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, at 27:42
  • 92. Manuele BOARO, TINKOFF, at 29:40
  • 93. Artem OVECHKIN, GAZ, at 30:38
  • 94. Evgeny PETROV, TINKOFF, at 30:38
  • 95. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 31:21
  • 96. Jay Robert THOMSON, DIMENSION DATA, at 36:31
  • 97. Filippo POZZATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 36:31
  • 98. Manuel QUINZIATO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 36:31
  • 99. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, at 36:31
  • 100. Mickael DELAGE, FDJ, at 36:31
  • 101. Marco COLEDAN, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 36:31
  • 102. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, at 36:31
  • 103. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 36:31
  • 104. Manuel SENNI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 36:31
  • 105. Biel KADRI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 36:31
  • 106. Kristian SBARAGLI, DIMENSION DATA, at 36:31
  • 107. Cristian RODRIGUEZ MARTIN, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 36:31
  • 108. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 36:31
  • 109. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, at 36:31
  • 110. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 36:31
  • 111. Francesco Manuel BONGIORNO, BARDIANI CSF, at 36:31
  • 112. Svein TUFT, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 36:31
  • 113. Grega BOLE, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 36:31
  • 114. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, at 36:31
  • 115. Eugenio ALAFACI, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 36:31
  • 116. Twan CASTELIJNS, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 36:31
  • 117. Cheng JI, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 36:31
  • 118. Sonny COLBRELLI, BARDIANI CSF, at 36:31
  • 119. Murilo Antonio FISCHER, FDJ, at 36:31
  • 120. Tom STAMSNIJDER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 36:31
  • 121. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 36:31
  • 122. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 36:31
  • 123. Songezo JIM, DIMENSION DATA, at 36:31
  • 124. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 36:31
  • 125. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 36:31
  • 126. Sam BEWLEY, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 36:31
  • 127. Andrei SOLOMENNIKOV, GAZ, at 36:31
  • 128. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 36:31
  • 129. Ignatas KONOVALOVAS, FDJ, at 36:31
  • 130. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 36:31
  • 131. Jack BOBRIDGE, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 36:31
  • 132. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, at 36:31
  • 133. Matteo TOSATTO, TINKOFF, at 36:31
  • 134. Alexander SEROV, GAZ, at 36:31
  • 135. Gianfranco ZILIOLI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 36:31
  • 136. Genki YAMAMOTO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 36:31
  • 137. Maxim BELKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 36:31
  • 138. Jelle VANENDERT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 36:31
  • 139. Pim LIGTHART, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 36:31
  • 140. Giacomo NIZZOLO, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 36:31
  • 141. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, at 36:31
  • 142. Arnaud COURTEILLE, FDJ, at 36:31
  • 143. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 36:31
  • 144. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, at 36:31
  • 145. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, at 36:31
  • 146. Alexander PORSEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 36:31
  • 147. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 36:31
  • 148. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, at 36:31
  • 149. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 36:31
  • 150. Matteo BUSATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 36:31
  • 151. Riccardo STACCHIOTTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 36:44
  • 152. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 36:44
  • 153. Sacha MODOLO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 36:58
  • 154. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 36:58
  • 155. Roger KLUGE, IAM CYCLING, at 36:58
  • 156. Roberto FERRARI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 36:58
  • 157. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 37:16
  • DNS Giulio CICCONE, BARDIANI CSF
  • DNF Carlos Alberto BETANCUR GOMEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM
  • DNF Ilnur ZAKARIN, TEAM KATUSHA
  • DNF Philip DEIGNAN, TEAM SKY

 

General classification

  • 1. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, in 78:14:20
  • 2. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :44
  • 3. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:05
  • 4. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 1:48
  • 5. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, at 3:59
  • 6. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 7:53
  • 7. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 9:34
  • 8. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 12:18
  • 9. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, at 13:19
  • 10. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 14:11
  • 11. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 18:41
  • 12. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 20:51
  • 13. Hubert DUPONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 21:32
  • 14. Maxime MONFORT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 29:53
  • 15. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, at 30:02
  • 16. Andre Fernando S. Martins CARDOSO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 31:11
  • 17. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 31:22
  • 18. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, at 33:30
  • 19. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 35:42
  • 20. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 37:17
  • 21. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, at 42:08
  • 22. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 45:36
  • 23. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 52:39
  • 24. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 56:23
  • 25. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 58:09
  • 26. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 1:07:15
  • 27. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, at 1:08:38
  • 28. Davide FORMOLO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:09:53
  • 29. Andrey ZEITS, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 1:10:17
  • 30. Igor ANTON HERNANDEZ, DIMENSION DATA, at 1:18:02
  • 31. Pavel KOCHETKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:20:28
  • 32. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, at 1:21:37
  • 33. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, at 1:24:07
  • 34. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:24:45
  • 35. Rein TAARAMAE, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:31:00
  • 36. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:34:24
  • 37. Davide MALACARNE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 1:35:46
  • 38. Pawel POLJANSKI, TINKOFF, at 1:35:56
  • 39. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:39:12
  • 40. Carlos VERONA QUINTANILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 1:43:21
  • 41. Marcel WYSS, IAM CYCLING, at 1:43:36
  • 42. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 1:44:01
  • 43. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, DIMENSION DATA, at 1:44:43
  • 44. Egor SILIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:48:01
  • 45. Jose Joaquin ROJAS GIL, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 1:50:07
  • 46. Riccardo ZOIDL, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 1:52:45
  • 47. Manuele BOARO, TINKOFF, at 1:54:13
  • 48. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:02:29
  • 49. Damien HOWSON, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 2:02:32
  • 50. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:04:05
  • 51. Matteo BUSATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:05:25
  • 52. Jesus HERNANDEZ BLAZQUEZ, TINKOFF, at 2:07:06
  • 53. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, at 2:09:29
  • 54. Guillaume BONNAFOND, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:09:52
  • 55. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:10:59
  • 56. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, at 2:13:00
  • 57. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:14:47
  • 58. Bram TANKINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 2:18:05
  • 59. Amets TXURRUKA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 2:22:54
  • 60. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 2:29:39
  • 61. José HERRADA LOPEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:30:41
  • 62. Christian KNEES, TEAM SKY, at 2:31:28
  • 63. Primož ROGLIC, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 2:35:18
  • 64. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:35:26
  • 65. Manuele MORI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:36:10
  • 66. Bakhtiyar KOZHATAYEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 2:40:25
  • 67. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, at 2:40:56
  • 68. Pieter SERRY, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 2:41:47
  • 69. Hugo HOULE, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:43:00
  • 70. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 2:43:22
  • 71. Laurent DIDIER, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:44:41
  • 72. Manuel SENNI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:45:04
  • 73. Simone PETILLI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:45:30
  • 74. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:50:49
  • 75. Ian BOSWELL, TEAM SKY, at 2:52:39
  • 76. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, at 2:53:02
  • 77. Sacha MODOLO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:53:52
  • 78. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:55:55
  • 79. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:57:25
  • 80. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, at 2:57:59
  • 81. Chad HAGA, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:58:12
  • 82. Evgeny PETROV, TINKOFF, at 2:59:00
  • 83. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, at 3:00:24
  • 84. Rory SUTHERLAND, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 3:01:00
  • 85. Adam HANSEN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:01:24
  • 86. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:01:35
  • 87. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:02:20
  • 88. Kristian SBARAGLI, DIMENSION DATA, at 3:07:11
  • 89. Eros CAPECCHI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 3:07:12
  • 90. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 3:09:04
  • 91. Sonny COLBRELLI, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:10:29
  • 92. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:10:46
  • 93. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 3:11:36
  • 94. Heinrich HAUSSLER, IAM CYCLING, at 3:11:46
  • 95. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, at 3:13:23
  • 96. Jelle VANENDERT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:14:52
  • 97. Cristian RODRIGUEZ MARTIN, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 3:15:37
  • 98. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, at 3:16:30
  • 99. Benoît VAUGRENARD, FDJ, at 3:17:25
  • 100. Vegard Stake LAENGEN, IAM CYCLING, at 3:17:55
  • 101. Eugenio ALAFACI, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 3:18:40
  • 102. Matteo TOSATTO, TINKOFF, at 3:21:09
  • 103. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:21:15
  • 104. Francesco Manuel BONGIORNO, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:21:29
  • 105. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:21:36
  • 106. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:21:59
  • 107. Anton VOROBYEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 3:22:49
  • 108. Martijn KEIZER, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 3:25:20
  • 109. Giacomo NIZZOLO, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 3:26:13
  • 110. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:28:57
  • 111. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 3:29:44
  • 112. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 3:29:58
  • 113. Twan CASTELIJNS, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 3:30:46
  • 114. Filippo POZZATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 3:31:16
  • 115. Maxim BELKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 3:33:06
  • 116. Manuel QUINZIATO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:33:55
  • 117. Gianfranco ZILIOLI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:35:14
  • 118. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:36:32
  • 119. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 3:37:17
  • 120. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 3:38:25
  • 121. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 3:38:56
  • 122. Albert TIMMER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 3:39:30
  • 123. Viacheslav KUZNETSOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 3:40:41
  • 124. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 3:41:21
  • 125. Pim LIGTHART, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:42:08
  • 126. Andrei SOLOMENNIKOV, GAZ, at 3:42:30
  • 127. Alexander SEROV, GAZ, at 3:43:59
  • 128. Marco COLEDAN, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 3:44:27
  • 129. Aleksey RYBALKIN, GAZ, at 3:45:13
  • 130. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 3:45:37
  • 131. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:45:48
  • 132. Roberto FERRARI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 3:50:30
  • 133. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, at 3:51:48
  • 134. Ignatas KONOVALOVAS, FDJ, at 3:54:00
  • 135. Grega BOLE, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:54:26
  • 136. Arnaud COURTEILLE, FDJ, at 3:55:31
  • 137. Roger KLUGE, IAM CYCLING, at 3:55:50
  • 138. Sam BEWLEY, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:56:40
  • 139. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 3:57:38
  • 140. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:58:18
  • 141. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:58:41
  • 142. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:58:47
  • 143. Artem OVECHKIN, GAZ, at 3:59:07
  • 144. Tom STAMSNIJDER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 4:00:52
  • 145. Songezo JIM, DIMENSION DATA, at 4:02:24
  • 146. Alexander PORSEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 4:04:00
  • 147. Svein TUFT, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 4:05:26
  • 148. Biel KADRI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 4:06:10
  • 149. Mickael DELAGE, FDJ, at 4:08:02
  • 150. Jay Robert THOMSON, DIMENSION DATA, at 4:09:25
  • 151. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 4:10:21
  • 152. Genki YAMAMOTO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 4:11:27
  • 153. Murilo Antonio FISCHER, FDJ, at 4:12:21
  • 154. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 4:13:31
  • 155. Cheng JI, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 4:26:04
  • 156. Riccardo STACCHIOTTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 4:27:38
  • 157. Jack BOBRIDGE, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 4:31:13

 

Points classification

  • 1. Giacomo NIZZOLO, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 185 points
  • 2. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 152 points
  • 3. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 141 points
  • 4. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, 127 points
  • 5. Sacha MODOLO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 126 points
  • 6. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, 88 points
  • 7. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 83 points
  • 8. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 76 points
  • 9. Alexander PORSEV, TEAM KATUSHA, 62 points
  • 10. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 61 points
  • 11. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, 57 points
  • 12. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 52 points
  • 13. Roger KLUGE, IAM CYCLING, 50 points
  • 14. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 47 points
  • 15. Anton VOROBYEV, TEAM KATUSHA, 46 points
  • 16. Sonny COLBRELLI, BARDIANI CSF, 46 points
  • 17. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 45 points
  • 18. Kristian SBARAGLI, DIMENSION DATA, 44 points
  • 19. Pim LIGTHART, LOTTO SOUDAL, 40 points
  • 20. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, 39 points
  • 21. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, 39 points
  • 22. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 38 points
  • 23. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 36 points
  • 24. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 35 points
  • 25. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 31 points
  • 26. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 30 points
  • 27. Vegard Stake LAENGEN, IAM CYCLING, 29 points
  • 28. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, 28 points
  • 29. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, 28 points
  • 30. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, 27 points
  • 31. Primož ROGLIC, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 27 points
  • 32. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, 27 points
  • 33. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, 26 points
  • 34. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, 24 points
  • 35. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, 24 points
  • 36. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, 21 points
  • 37. Pieter SERRY, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 20 points
  • 38. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 20 points
  • 39. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 20 points
  • 40. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 19 points
  • 41. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, 17 points
  • 42. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, 17 points
  • 43. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, 16 points
  • 44. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, 16 points
  • 45. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, 16 points
  • 46. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, 16 points
  • 47. Amets TXURRUKA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 16 points
  • 48. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 16 points
  • 49. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 15 points
  • 50. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, 14 points
  • 51. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, 14 points
  • 52. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 14 points
  • 53. Mickael DELAGE, FDJ, 14 points
  • 54. Marco COLEDAN, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 13 points
  • 55. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, 13 points
  • 56. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, 12 points
  • 57. Matteo BUSATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 12 points
  • 58. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, 12 points
  • 59. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 12 points
  • 60. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, 11 points
  • 61. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, 10 points
  • 62. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 10 points
  • 63. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, 10 points
  • 64. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, 10 points
  • 65. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, 10 points
  • 66. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 10 points
  • 67. Heinrich HAUSSLER, IAM CYCLING, 9 points
  • 68. Carlos VERONA QUINTANILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 8 points
  • 69. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 8 points
  • 70. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 7 points
  • 71. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 7 points
  • 72. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 7 points
  • 73. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 6 points
  • 74. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 6 points
  • 75. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 5 points
  • 76. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 5 points
  • 77. Marcel WYSS, IAM CYCLING, 4 points
  • 78. Viacheslav KUZNETSOV, TEAM KATUSHA, 4 points
  • 79. Biel KADRI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 4 points
  • 80. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 3 points
  • 81. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 3 points
  • 82. Christian KNEES, TEAM SKY, 3 points
  • 83. Laurent DIDIER, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 3 points
  • 84. Eugenio ALAFACI, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 3 points
  • 85. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 3 points
  • 86. Ignatas KONOVALOVAS, FDJ, 3 points
  • 87. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 3 points
  • 88. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 2 points
  • 89. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 2 points
  • 90. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 2 points
  • 91. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, 2 points
  • 92. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 2 points
  • 93. Hubert DUPONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 1 point
  • 94. Maxime MONFORT, LOTTO SOUDAL, 1 point
  • 95. Davide MALACARNE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 1 point
  • 96. Riccardo ZOIDL, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 1 point
  • 97. Manuele BOARO, TINKOFF, 1 point
  • 98. Roberto FERRARI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 1 point
  • 99. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, 1 point
  • 100. Arnaud COURTEILLE, FDJ, 1 point

 

Mountains classification

  • 1. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 134 points
  • 2. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, 98 points
  • 3. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, 73 points
  • 4. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, 69 points
  • 5. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, 61 points
  • 6. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, 54 points
  • 7. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 51 points
  • 8. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 42 points
  • 9. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 42 points
  • 10. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, 41 points
  • 11. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 36 points
  • 12. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, 36 points
  • 13. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 31 points
  • 14. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, 31 points
  • 15. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, 26 points
  • 16. Jhoan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 26 points
  • 17. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 23 points
  • 18. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 22 points
  • 19. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 20 points
  • 20. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, 19 points
  • 21. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, 18 points
  • 22. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 18 points
  • 23. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, 17 points
  • 24. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 16 points
  • 25. Maxime MONFORT, LOTTO SOUDAL, 16 points
  • 26. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, 15 points
  • 27. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, 14 points
  • 28. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, 13 points
  • 29. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, 11 points
  • 30. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 11 points
  • 31. Andre Fernando S. Martins CARDOSO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 10 points
  • 32. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 9 points
  • 33. Manuele MORI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 9 points
  • 34. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 8 points
  • 35. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, 8 points
  • 36. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, 8 points
  • 37. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 8 points
  • 38. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 8 points
  • 39. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, 7 points
  • 40. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 7 points
  • 41. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, 6 points
  • 42. Hubert DUPONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 6 points
  • 43. Jose Joaquin ROJAS GIL, MOVISTAR TEAM, 6 points
  • 44. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 6 points
  • 45. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 6 points
  • 46. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 6 points
  • 47. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 6 points
  • 48. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 5 points
  • 49. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 4 points
  • 50. Ian BOSWELL, TEAM SKY, 4 points
  • 51. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, 4 points
  • 52. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 3 points
  • 53. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, 3 points
  • 54. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 2 points
  • 55. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 2 points
  • 56. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 2 points
  • 57. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, 2 points
  • 58. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, 2 points
  • 59. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 1 point
  • 60. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, 1 point
  • 61. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, 1 point
  • 62. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, 1 point

 

Youth classification

  • 1. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, in 78:22:13
  • 2. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, at 22:09
  • 3. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 59:22
  • 4. Davide FORMOLO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:02:00
  • 5. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:31:19
  • 6. Carlos VERONA QUINTANILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 1:35:28
  • 7. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, DIMENSION DATA, at 1:36:50
  • 8. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:54:36
  • 9. Damien HOWSON, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 1:54:39
  • 10. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, at 2:01:36
  • 11. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:03:06
  • 12. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:06:54
  • 13. Bakhtiyar KOZHATAYEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 2:32:32
  • 14. Manuel SENNI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:37:11
  • 15. Simone PETILLI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:37:37
  • 16. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:42:56
  • 17. Ian BOSWELL, TEAM SKY, at 2:44:46
  • 18. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:48:02
  • 19. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:49:32
  • 20. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, at 2:50:06
  • 21. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 3:01:11
  • 22. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:02:53
  • 23. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 3:03:43
  • 24. Cristian RODRIGUEZ MARTIN, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 3:07:44
  • 25. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, at 3:08:37
  • 26. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:13:22
  • 27. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 3:21:51
  • 28. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 3:22:05
  • 29. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:28:39
  • 30. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 3:29:24
  • 31. Aleksey RYBALKIN, GAZ, at 3:37:20
  • 32. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:37:55
  • 33. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, at 3:43:55
  • 34. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 3:49:45
  • 35. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:50:48
  • 36. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:50:54
  • 37. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 4:02:28
  • 38. Genki YAMAMOTO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 4:03:34
  • 39. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 4:05:38
  • 40. Riccardo STACCHIOTTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 4:19:45

 

Teams classification

  • 1. Astana Pro Team, in 235:05:37
  • 2. Cannondale Pro Cycling Team, at 12:09
  • 3. Movistar Team, at 18:56
  • 4. Ag2R La Mondiale, at 27:27
  • 5. Team Sky, at 38:25
  • 6. Tinkoff, at 1:10:14
  • 7. Etixx – Quick Step, at 1:15:25
  • 8. Team Katusha, at 1:59:21
  • 9. Team Dimension Data, at 2:37:24
  • 10. Team Lotto Nl – Jumbo, at 2:42:05
  • 11. Lampre – Merida, at 2:42:22
  • 12. Orica Greenedge, at 3:08:43
  • 13. Bmc Racing Team, at 3:26:17
  • 14. Team Giant – Alpecin, at 3:46:30
  • 15. Lotto Soudal, at 4:35:20
  • 16. Trek Factory Racing, at 4:48:02
  • 17. Gazprom-Rusvelo, at 4:51:52
  • 18. Bardiani Csf, at 4:53:07
  • 19. Iam Cycling, at 5:26:05
  • 20. Wilier Triestina – Southeast, at 6:23:16
  • 21. Nippo – Vini Fantini, at 6:38:03
  • 22. Fdj, at 9:50:17

The post Kruijswijk crumbles, Nibali wins Giro stage 19 appeared first on VeloNews.com.

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Phinney, Small win U.S. TT nationals http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/race-report/phinney-small-win-u-s-tt-nationals_407640 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/race-report/phinney-small-win-u-s-tt-nationals_407640#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 14:43:01 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407640

Taylor Phinney claimed his third career time trial national championship in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Taylor Phinney wins his third national time trial championship, and Carmen Small surprises pre-race favorites with big win in Winston-Salem.

The post Phinney, Small win U.S. TT nationals appeared first on VeloNews.com.

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Taylor Phinney claimed his third career time trial national championship in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Taylor Phinney is back — in a big way. The BMC rider, whose professional career was in doubt after a traumatic crash two years ago at U.S. Pro nationals in Chattanooga, Tennessee, stormed to his third career national time trial championship Friday in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Phinney bested second-place finisher Tom Zirbel, of Rally, by 1:09.36 with a time of 1:02:46 on the 48km course. LottoNL – Jumbo’s Alexey Vermeulen was third, 1:12.14 back.

While the win was convincing, Phinney struggled with doubts throughout the hour-long time trial.

“Man, that was very hard,” Phinney said. “Anytime you’re doing an hour-long time trial it’s definitely a mental journey. I was going back and forth. Starting out I thought I was flying and then pretty much gave up on myself. And then I was like, ‘No, don’t do that,’ and I came back.”

Self-doubt aside, Phinney’s third national title positions him well for his main season goal: a spot on Team USA at the summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

“I wanted to come and win this,” said the 25-year-old Coloradan. “And not only win it but deliver a strong performance, and I think I did that today, so it’s a good stepping stone and it makes my chances even better for making [the Olympics].”

Carmen Small defeats pre-race favorite Armstrong

In the women’s race, Cervelo – Bigla’s Carmen Small stunned with a victory ahead of pre-race favorite Kristin Armstrong, who had to settle for third place. Bepink’s Amber Neben finished second, 22.7 seconds behind Small’s time of 42:32.

At the finish, Small was ecstatic.

“I just left it all out there,” Small explained. “The last 300 meters I wanted to die, but I had my coach in my ear saying, ‘Go, go, go! Every second counts.’ I’m not going to lie, I’m pretty happy right now. I worked really hard over the winter, mostly for road racing. I came out in the spring and really pushed for results to prove I belong on the [Rio Olympic] team. But I got to come home a few weeks early, so I had a chance to do some proper preparation for the time trial. And today it all paid off.”

The result was a surprise, with Small taking more than a minute out of pre-race favorite and two-time Olympic Gold medalist, Kristin Armstrong – who attributed her less than stellar performance to dizziness caused by North Carolina’s heat and humidity.

“The humidity was really hard for me today, and so my body just didn’t cool. I gave it everything I had, but it wasn’t my day.”

For Armstrong, who has spent the past year working to earn a return trip to the Summer Games, the day was a disappointment, but hopefully not a deal-breaker.

“The good news is it was not Rio today. It’s all about preparation. I was at the Tour of California last week, so my form is on. I don’t think there’s any doubt that those who were expected to win today weren’t on the top step, but the good news is that I’ve been consistent in all of my performances. I’ve been on the podium. I’ve been on the top step. So this is going to make me go back and really think about what I need to do before Rio, but I feel confident still. It’s two and a half months away. Amber and Carmen had better days, but I really came back for one day: August 10 [the Olympic time trial]. I’m looking forward to it.”

The remaining spots on Team USA will be selected via coaches’ pick on June 24.

Men’s results

  • 1. Taylor Phinney, Bmc Racing Team, in 1:02:45.71
  • 2. Thomas Zirbel, Rally Cycling, at 1:09.36
  • 3. Alexey Vermeulen, Team Lotto Nl – Jumbo, at 1:12.14
  • 4. Brent Bookwalter, Bmc Racing Team, at 1:35.48
  • 5. Evan Huffman, Rally Cycling, at 1:51.55
  • 6. Mac Brennan, Holowesko | Citadel Racing Team P/b Hincapie Racing, at 2:13.56
  • 7. Benjamin Wolfe, Jelly Belly P/b Maxxis, at 2:32.82
  • 8. David Williams, Astellas Cycling Team, at 2:47.94
  • 9. Gregory Daniel, Axeon Hagens Berman, at 2:58.71
  • 10. Eamon Franck, Astellas Cycling Team, at 3:40.45
  • 11. Robin Carpenter, Holowesko | Citadel Racing Team P/b Hincapie Racing, at 3:40.84
  • 12. Taylor Shelden, Jelly Belly P/b Maxxis, at 5:19.17
  • 13. Michael Olheiser, Lupus Racing Team, at 5:49.07
  • 14. Bryan Lewis, Lupus Racing Team, at 7:21.71
  • 15. Julian Kyer, Elevate Pro Cycling Team, at 7:41.18
  • 16. Cory Greenberg, Cylance-Cannondale Pro Cycling P/b Incycle, at 8:26.57
  • DNF Johnathan Freter, Astellas Cycling Team
  • DSQ Daniel Eaton, Unitedhealthcare
  • DNS Joshua Berry, Jelly Belly P/b Maxxis
  • DNS Brendan Rhim, Holowesko | Citadel Racing Team P/b Hincapie Racing

 

Women’s results

  • 1. Carmen Small, Cervelo Bigla Pro Cycling Team, in 0:42:32
  • 2. Amber Neben, Bepink, at 0:22.70
  • 3. Kristin Armstrong Savola, Twenty16 Ridebiker, at 1:08.56
  • 4. Brianna Walle, Team Tibco – Silicon Valley Bank, at 1:31.46
  • 5. Lauren Stephens, Team Tibco – Silicon Valley Bank, at 1:52.49
  • 6. Evelyn Stevens, Boels Dolmans Cycling Team, at 1:53.02
  • 7. Tayler Wiles, Orica-Ais, at 1:54.02
  • 8. Chloe Dygert, Twenty16 Ridebiker, at 1:56.34
  • 9. Julie Emmerman, Rally Sport Cycling Team, at 2:54.65
  • 10. Leah Thomas, Twenty16 Ridebiker, at 3:02.89
  • 11. Jessica Cutler, Colavita/bianchi Racing, at 3:13.13
  • 12. Allie Dragoo, Twenty16 Ridebiker, at 3:31.77
  • 13. Jessica Prinner, Rally Cycling, at 3:44.43
  • 14. Kelly Catlin, Northstar Development Cycling, at 3:47.02
  • 15. Gretchen Stumhofer, Colavita|bianchi, at 3:47.05
  • 16. Whitney Allison, Colavita/bianchi Racing, at 4:04.75
  • 17. Emma White, Rally Cycling, at 4:12.37
  • 18. Sara Headley, at 4:23.36
  • 19. Alison Tetrick, Cylance Pro Cycling Team, at 4:28.81
  • 20. Beth Ann Orton, Visit Dallas Dna Pro Cycling, at 4:31.07
  • 21. Stefanie Sydlik, Qcw Breakawaybikes.com P.b. Felt Bicycles-Jlvelo, at 4:32.72
  • 22. Scotti Lechuga, Hagens Berman | Supermint Pro Cycling Team, at 4:36.11
  • 23. Nina Laughlin, Visit Dallas Dna Pro Cycling, at 5:02.82
  • 24. Cecilia Davishayes, Velo Classic Cycling P/b Stan’s Notubes, at 5:10.01
  • 25. Tarah Cole, Qcw Breakawaybikes.com P.b. Felt Bicycles-Jlvelo, at 5:11.70
  • 26. Kathryn Buss, Orthocarolina Winston Women’s Cycling, at 5:18.39
  • 27. Amber Pierce, Vitalogic Astrokalb Radunion NÃÐ, at 5:21.39
  • 28. Breanne Nalder, Visit Dallas Dna Pro Cycling, at 5:23.37
  • 29. Heather Fischer, Rally Cycling, at 6:08.85
  • 30. Jannalyn Luttrell, Happy Tooth Dental Professional Cycling, at 6:09.49
  • 31. Ruth Winder, Usa National Team, at 6:09.57
  • 32. Jennifer Tetrick, Twenty16 Ridebiker, at 6:37.93
  • 33. Clio Dinan, Velo Classic Cycling P/b Stan’s Notubes, at 7:53.61
  • 34. Alexis Ryan, Canyon Sram Racing, at 7:55.14
  • 35. Sara Youmans, Monster Media Elite Women, at 7:56.93
  • 36. Madison Kelly, Stradalli Cycles/papa John’s, at 8:03.05
  • 37. Ashlyn Woods, Happy Tooth Dental Professional Cycling, at 8:45.56
  • 38. Katherine Shields, Orthocarolina Winston Women’s Cycling, at 9:27.16

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Chaos on Giro’s Cima Coppi http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/zakarin-out-of-giro-after-crash_407633 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/zakarin-out-of-giro-after-crash_407633#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 14:19:00 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407633

After crashing into a snow bank, Steven Kruijswijk was forced to chase alone and eventually lost his ovreall Giro lead. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

Two major GC contenders crash in the Giro d'Italia's mountains, throwing the race for the pink jersey into a state of flux.

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After crashing into a snow bank, Steven Kruijswijk was forced to chase alone and eventually lost his ovreall Giro lead. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

The Giro d’Italia’s Cima Coppi, the highest mountain of the race, was unkind to a few GC contenders, but it was actually the Colle dell’Agnello’s descent that wreaked the most havoc.

True, Movistar’s Alejandro Valverde was dropped on the climb, possibly suffering from the altitude, which he said affected him in the Dolomites. At the start of the day, he was third overall. But really, most fans will remember the two big crashes on the Agnello’s long, foggy descent from the top of the 2,744-meter (9,004-foot) peak.

First, the pink jersey wearer, the race leader, Steven Kruijswijk (LottoNL – Jumbo) crashed into a snow bank, losing contact with GC rivals at the top of the descent.

Then, on the sunny lower slopes of the descent, helicopter cameras zoomed in on a figure in red, crumpled in a meadow on the side of the road. It was Katusha’s Ilnur Zakarin, who started the day fifth overall. The Russian abandoned the race with a broken clavicle and shoulder blade.

Kruijswijk would go on to lose the pink jersey and fall to third in the overall, 1:05 behind Orica – GreenEdge’s Esteban Chaves. Full stage 19 race report >>

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Commentary: What Canyon’s U.S. presence means for consumers and bike shops http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/commentary-what-canyons-u-s-presence-means-for-consumers-and-bike-shops_407521 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/commentary-what-canyons-u-s-presence-means-for-consumers-and-bike-shops_407521#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 14:00:22 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407521

Canyon bicycles will soon be available in the U.S., which is great news for excited consumers and tough news for bike shops. Photo: Dan Cavallari

How will the German manufacturer's consumer-direct sales model affect things at the local bike shop level?

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Canyon bicycles will soon be available in the U.S., which is great news for excited consumers and tough news for bike shops. Photo: Dan Cavallari

The wait is finally over — almost. Bicycle Retailer reports that Canyon Bicycles will enter the U.S. market in early 2017, offering direct-to-consumer sales of its German-built bicycles. It’s great news for eager U.S. customers, and another daunting sign for local bike shops.

Here’s how it works: Customers who order a Canyon receive the bike almost completely built out of the box, with minimal assembly required. It’s a model that has helped Canyon become one of the biggest bike brands in Europe.

For its U.S. business, Canyon will still sell bicycles manufactured in its facility in Koblenz, Germany, however the company will warehouse additional inventory in the U.S. Canyon has plans to open a customer and technical support center. The company has yet to choose a location for these facilities.

This is a big moment for U.S. consumers who have long lusted after Canyon’s high-end bicycles, which traditionally are easy on the wallet. The news is also another example of how the U.S. bicycle market is rapidly adopting the consumer-direct model. Last year, Trek launched its own direct-to-consumer program, and Giant announced its own program earlier this year.

Both of those programs still ship bicycles to traditional brick-and-mortar shops. The Canyon model, however, cuts the bike shop completely out of the transaction. The question is what this push toward the consumer-direct model has on brick-and-mortar bike shops.

Is this the end of bike shops?

Full disclosure: I’m a bike shop guy. I’ve spent the better part of two decades working in shops and think they are an integral, if not immeasurable, part of why bicycles survive in this country at all. They are more than sales floors: They are community centers, educational opportunities, and rallying points for the cycling community.

Canyon’s entry into the U.S. market undoubtedly marks a turning point for these businesses. For years, local bike shops have feared the growth of the consumer-direct bicycle market, since it largely cuts bike shops out of the mix.

Trek and Giant both created business models that give business back to their dealers. Canyon’s model, however does not.

The alarmist opinion that I’ve heard is that the shift toward consumer-direct bicycles like Canyon marks the death of the bike shop as we know it. Canyon’s sales model has been wildly successful in other parts of the world, largely because customers are conditioned to online shopping: lower prices, convenient shopping, all from the living room couch. The sales process couldn’t be easier. How can brick-and-mortar shops ever compete with this?

In this stark scenario, more bike companies switch to consumer-direct, and eventually, nobody buys bikes at bike shops anymore. Traditional mom-and-pop bike shops simply fade away into history, like CD shops or independent hardware stores.

Could consumer-direct create opportunities for shops?

In a more optimistic scenario, the growth of consumer-direct creates business opportunities for shops. Remember the “any ol’ wrench, or proper torque wrench” issue? Imagine throngs of consumer-direct customers banging on their bikes with the wrong tools. In this scenario, the service-centric model may be the best opportunity for the independent bike shop to survive. Those bicycles will still need tune-ups well after they come out of the box, after all. Shops might gravitate toward having smaller showrooms with beefed-up service centers.

Shop employees are taking this seriously; just look at probma.org, the nascent homepage of the Professional Bicycle Mechanics Association (PBMA), a group dedicated to setting professional standards for the guys working on your bike.

Could Canyon’s model create an opportunity for shops to compete on customer service and product availability? Consumer-direct businesses compete on price and convenience, but can they make a customer happy if something goes wrong? As we all know, if you break a chain the morning of your ride, a consumer-direct business cannot compete with a local bike shop. Sure, it’s cheaper to buy on the Internet, but you’re going to have to skip your ride.

Plus, there are going to be hurdles to Canyon’s model. Already, the company says customers can expect the bike to be delivered within 2-6 weeks after the initial order — and the potential hassle of shipping. And while Canyon promises minimal assembly, the consumer will still need to pick up a wrench.

A realistic middle ground

The reality, which probably lies somewhere in the middle of those sentiments, is that the best bike shops will survive, while others will close. The best shops are often run by businesspeople who enjoy bicycles, rather than bike nuts who happen to run a business. As more and more brands go consumer-direct, an optimistic view is that consumers will see the wheat separated from the chaff: Strong shops will survive based on customer loyalty and a strong service department, not to mention online sales from a well-maintained website, while weaker shops will perish based on reluctance to adapt.

Look, I’m a bike shop guy. But I honestly can’t fault Canyon or Trek for seeing an opportunity to cut costs, make more money, and streamline sales. You also can’t fault shop owners for their anger toward a rapidly changing sales paradigm that largely excludes them.

In simple Darwinian terms: Those who don’t adapt perish. Trek and Canyon have adapted.  Bike shops need to do the same. The local bike shop has had a magical resistance to free market realities, largely based on the notion that shops are the center to the industry’s survival. That’s changing, for better or worse, and Canyon’s arrival is hastening that change.

It is vital, in my opinion, that the best shops survive. It is reality that those best shops are the ones that adapt.

Is there a solution?

OK — time to get on my soapbox.

Manufacturers, I’m talking to you. Don’t be a bully here. Yes, your bottom line matters, but remember how easy it is to build a reputation as the company that put the nail in the coffin of poor ol’ local bike shop. Next thing you know, you’re Frank Underwood pushing the local bike shop in front of the D.C. metro train. Ultimately, cycling is about more than a product. Your customers want an experience, and bike shops can provide that. Make that work to your advantage.

Bike shops, now I’m talking to you. You’re Dumbledore. Your presence is important, but in the end it’s not always central to the story. There’s a scenario in which the industry survives without many of you. Please act accordingly: Do what’s in the best interest for your business, which means realizing you are mortal. Please understand that people like you, but will continue riding bikes if you’re not around, and remember that while you will be missed if you’re gone, someone will step up if you don’t. Tradition goes a long way in the cycling world, but you cannot rely on it as the cornerstone of your business. Make your website a functional store (try Smartetailing because you quite simply don’t have time to do this yourself) and listen to what your customers want, not necessarily what you already have.

And consumers, now I’m talking to you. Stop being precious. You live in a magnificent time and have access to amazing high-tech bicycles. Support your local bike shop, even if it costs a few bucks more, because they’ll be there to get that chain link for you or fix your bent derailleur hanger (yes, the one you bent by leaning your bike on the drive-side). And understand that the reason your bike shop can’t give you a better price on that shiny new bike is because you keep buying stuff online instead of buying local.

We all have skin in this game, so we’re all responsible if suddenly there’s no such thing as customer service. And let’s be honest: It always feels better to yell at someone in person about getting the order wrong, than to someone on the phone an ocean away.

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Week in Tech: Mavic’s MTB rims, eTap shifters, and more http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/week-in-tech-mavics-mtb-rims-etap-shifters-and-more_407532 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/week-in-tech-mavics-mtb-rims-etap-shifters-and-more_407532#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 13:11:42 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407532

Mavic released its first ever full-carbon mountain bike rims. Photo: Mavic

This week, Mavic unveils its new mountain bike rims, SRAM announces new eTap Clic shifters for aerobars, and much more.

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Mavic released its first ever full-carbon mountain bike rims. Photo: Mavic

Here’s the Week in Tech — all the gear news, tips, and announcements you need and none of the marketing gibberish you don’t.

Mavic launches new full-carbon mountain bike rims

Mavic unveiled its first full-carbon mountain bike rims, the XA Pro Carbon. Available in both 27.5-inch and 29-inch options, the full carbon rim is 100-percent UST compliant and has a hookless design to reduce weight and improve durability. The rims will be available starting in September and will cost $1,850.

Read More >>

SRAM eTap releases Clic buttons for aerobars

New aerobar extension shifter buttons are now available with SRAM’s eTap wireless drivetrain. The eTap Clics fit into the ends of extensions with an inner diameter of 19-21.5 millimeters and connect to the eTap BlipBox for easy shifting while riding in the aero position. The Clics will be available starting in July and will be priced at $100.

Read More >>

Quality bikes for kids is Islabikes’s mission

Portland’s Islabikes launched a new series of bikes called the Pro Series that are made specifically or kids. The line includes mountain, cyclocross, and road bikes that are built with premium components to suit the age and size of kids. If a certain component doesn’t exist to fit these needs, Islabike will make it in-house.

The company is also giving back to its local community by donating bikes to Portland’s Community Cycling Center. This nonprofit organization is determined to grow the bicycle movement by showing kids how to fix their own bikes and get them exploring their neighborhoods. With a larger fleet of quality bikes, the Community Cycling Center is able to take kids on rides, adventures, and bike camps that may have been out of reach otherwise.

Read More >>

360-degree cameras now available at retailers

360fly announced global retail availability for the 4k cameras that can mount to your bike or helmet for 360-degree video recording. The single-lens camera captures stitch-less, 360-degree video with interactive and mobile virtual reality viewing capabilities. The cameras are arriving at retailers now and will continue to roll out through June.

Read More >>

Mavic supports USA Cycling for nationals and Olympics

Mavic announced a partnership with USA Cycling to provide neutral support for national championship events, including masters and the pro road race and time trial events this week in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Mavic also announced it will be the official wheel supplier to the USA Cycling track teams through the upcoming Olympics with the Comete, iO, and new Rio wheels.

Read More >>

New app calculates your finish time for rides and races

The free ETA App is a GPS-based app that provides estimated finish times by using a “smoothing average” pace calculation, which differs from the instantaneous pace calculation used by many GPS watches. The app continually calculates and updates your current estimated time of arrival and provides information about the average pace needed to meet certain time goals. The app is only available for iPhones, but an Android version is coming soon.

Read More >>

Flyrack’s wall-mounted bike rack live on Kickstarter

Flyrack is the newest cycling product to jump on the Kickstarter movement with a new campaign for its wall-mounted bike rack. The design is simple and holds bikes up and out of the way for more organized bike storage. And when the rack isn’t in use, you can fold it up and use it as a picture frame to decorate your wall.

Read More >>

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Bargain riding: A Kruijswijk Giro win would be budget milestone http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/bargain-riding-a-kruijswijk-giro-win-would-be-budget-milestone_407621 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/bargain-riding-a-kruijswijk-giro-win-would-be-budget-milestone_407621#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 13:00:01 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407621

Steven Kruiswijk is having the race of his life at the Giro. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

With the LottoNL – Jumbo squad operating on a budget that's roughly half of Sky's, Steven Kruijswijk is leading the Giro on the cheap.

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Steven Kruiswijk is having the race of his life at the Giro. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

PINEROLO, Italy (VN) — Not only would a Giro d’Italia victory by Steven Kruijswijk be a historic first for the Netherlands, it would also be a major milestone in cycling’s ever-increasing budget wars.

LottoNL – Jumbo’s budget and Kruijswijk’s salary are nowhere near the stratospheric sums of the peloton’s top WorldTour squads, but the team’s Giro success reconfirms that money doesn’t always buy success.

“In terms of our budget, this is so important to us,” LottoNL sport director Addy Engels said. “We cannot compete with the budgets of the big teams, but here we are competing for a grand tour victory. This is very big.”

Just consider the numbers: Based on estimations, Sky’s budget is nearly $35 million annually, while LottoNL operates on less than half of that, about $17 million. Sky offered a succulent contract worth an estimated $2 million per season to Mikel Landa to lead for the Giro this season. The Basque climber is now at home, while Kruijswijk earns an estimated $500,00 per season and rides into the Alps with the pink jersey on his broad shoulders.

What gives? Money can only go so far to guarantee success in a grand tour.

Even with the biggest budget in cycling, Sky has been unable to crack the Giro despite dedicating a significant amount of resources and budget toward the maglia rosa. Bradley Wiggins infamously fizzled out in 2013 and Richie Porte pulled the plug in 2015. Rigoberto Urán came the closest, riding to second in 2013 in a Sky jersey, and has since joined Cannondale.

Looking at the past 10 or so editions of the Giro, the pink jersey has been won by a top-salaried, pre-race favorite. The lone exception is Ryder Hesjedal’s victory in 2012 with the Slipstream organization, another team typically hovering near the bottom rung in the WorldTour salary ladder.

While the top teams have the money to sign the best riders — Astana and Movistar also boast annual budgets topping $25 million — the punishing demands of a grand tour mean there are no guarantees. Money only buys potential. Illness and crashes inevitably take their collective toll, and this year, GC contenders such as Landa, Jean-Christophe Péraud (Ag2r La Mondiale), Tom Dumoulin (Giant – Alpecin), and Trek – Segafredo’s Hesjedal have all packed it in.

Teams constantly try to strike a balance between the salary demands of established GC riders and trying to develop in-house talent. It’s like buying Google at $700 a share and hoping it keeps rising, or getting in on the ground floor of the next Über.

That long-term strategy has worked well this season for Orica – GreenEdge, which resisted paying big salaries for established GC stars and patiently nurtured Esteban Chaves to grow without pressure. Katusha has taken a similar tact with Ilnur Zakarin, fifth overall at this Giro.

“You pay the money, or you take the young guy and develop them,” Katusha general manager Viatcheslav Ekimov said. “There are only a few GC guys on the market, and you need a lot of cash to buy them. It depends what the agents want, and they push their price. They push until the market answers them.”

Kruijswijk is also a “homegrown” product of LottoNL. With DNA tracing back to the once-mighty Rabobank organization, the current LottoNL squad is operating on a relative shoestring budget.

The 28-year-old Kruijswijk joined the Rabobank development team in 2007 for three seasons, where he was a teammate of Tejay van Garderen, before jumping to the WorldTour team in 2010. While the squad morphed from Rabobank to Blanco and later Belkin to today’s current sponsorship deal, and many of the staffers and management have left, Kruijswijk was given space to gain experience, overcome injuries, and slow-cook into a legitimate GC contender.

That investment will pay huge dividends if Kruijswijk hangs on to become the first Dutch winner of the Giro. The irony is if he does win, LottoNL might not be able to afford to keep him. Kruijswijk is off contract in 2016, and if he makes history Sunday in Torino, his asking price will likely quadruple.

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More than a jersey on the line for Armstrong http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/more-than-a-jersey-on-the-line-for-armstrong_407607 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/more-than-a-jersey-on-the-line-for-armstrong_407607#comments Fri, 27 May 2016 00:45:14 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407607

Kristin Armstrong turned in the best time early at 2015 world championships. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Kristen Armstrong is trying to eliminate any doubts about whether she should be selected for the U.S. Rio Olympic team at nationals.

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Kristin Armstrong turned in the best time early at 2015 world championships. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

As a two-time Olympic gold medalist and the reigning women’s U.S. national time trial champion, you would think that Kristin Armstrong’s path to the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil would be relatively smooth. But as she awaits the selection committee’s decision in June, Armstrong isn’t about to sit up in what has become a real life race against the clock.

It all began a year ago, when the twice-retired Armstrong announced she would seek one last shot at Olympic glory. With the prospect of an automatic spot on Team USA up for grabs with a podium at Richmond worlds, Armstrong began working her way backward. How does a 42-year-old, retired time trialist assure herself a spot on perhaps the most coveted worlds squad in American history? By winning nationals, of course. And that’s just what she did.

Richmond didn’t go quite as smooth, however. While Armstrong took top honors among Americans, she failed to land herself a podium, dashing her hopes of an automatic Rio ticket. Since, she has walked what she describes as a perilous tightrope, racing throughout the spring of 2016 with little margin for error.

“It’s been really hard. I will be straight up,” she said. “I feel that I have to go out and win at everything that I do. It’s like I always have to be on. Whether it’s a regional race, a Women’s WorldTour race, or a national championship — none of which are written into the criteria as Olympic qualifiers, incidentally — I just feel like I always have to go out with the expectation that one mishap, one failure, could sink my chances.”

And so with three Olympic slots as yet unnamed, the two-time world champion plans to settle the matter just as she has so often on the road: decisively.

“I don’t even want there to be a discussion [among the selection committee],” Armstrong explains. “I want to have shown that I can complete against the best in the world and be selected. Period. I don’t want there to be any doubts.”

The women’s Olympic team will be comprised of four members: Boels – Dolman’s Megan Guarnier (third in the world’s road race), and three additional members to be selected June 24 via coaches’ pick. Two of these spots will compete in the Olympic time trial, while the third will be dedicated solely to the road race. But in an interesting twist, both time trialists must compete in the road race as well, which means that the selection committee will look for a pair of all-rounders.

This fact has caused Armstrong to readjust her 2016, adding a vigorous road calendar to what began as a TT-focused comeback. It’s a shift Armstrong has made with style.

“You know, I didn’t get chosen for the world’s road team last year in Richmond, because I decided to come back and focus on time trialing,” the Boise, Idaho native added. “I didn’t get chosen because I hadn’t been road racing. But that doesn’t mean I forgot how to do it. It just means I didn’t do it.”

Determined to show her mettle in both disciplines, Armstrong began 2016 with a solid block of road racing, including Redlands, the Tour of the Gila and the Amgen Tour of California. While this has meant more travel than she might have anticipated a year ago, the reigning national champion has found road racing to be a win-win proposition, further improving her time trialing in the process.

“Road racing is not only great for my fitness, it’s actually bumped me up a level [as a time trialist] from even six months ago,” she said. “It’s been very rewarding to be with my team and help with their development, but I also just can’t afford to leave any questions on the table about whether I’m ready to race on the road. Clearly I am.”

This weekend in Winston-Salem, Armstrong hopes to put an exclamation point on her Olympic ambitions with her fifth national time trial championship.

“This is a really big race,” she explained of Friday’s USA Cycling National Time Trial Championship. “It’s not often that we get to go head-to-head against one another. Three of us got to in Richmond, but really its unusual for us all to show up on the same day on the same start line.”

In the end, Armstrong plans to leave it all out on the roads of North Carolina and let the chips fall where they may.

“My whole goal since coming back last year has been that I just need to show up in good form and everything else will just sort itself out. I came back to go after a gold medal and if I’m not performing at the top consistently, then that chance of a gold medal just won’t be possible. But I feel like this has all gone well.”

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Moser: Second place is not good http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/moser-oh-so-close-to-giro-win_407597 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/moser-oh-so-close-to-giro-win_407597#comments Thu, 26 May 2016 22:01:56 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407597

Moreno Moser buried himself up the final cobbled hill to fight for the stage win on Thursday, but ultimately, he came up short. Photo: Graham Watson | Cannondale Pro Cycling

Moreno Moser came painfully close to a win in Giro d'Italia's stage 18, the latest near-miss for the Cannondale team.

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Moreno Moser buried himself up the final cobbled hill to fight for the stage win on Thursday, but ultimately, he came up short. Photo: Graham Watson | Cannondale Pro Cycling

PINEROLO, Italy (VN) — In an instant, Moreno Moser went from sizing up a likely Giro d’Italia stage win, to wishing he had eyes in the back of his head.

The Cannondale rider attacked out of a breakaway with Gianluca Brambilla at the end of the Giro’s longest stage, and was within 100 meters of sprinting when Matteo Trentin bolted past his right shoulder in a hail-Mary counter-attack. Etixx – Quick-Step had just picked his pocket.

“I didn’t know that Trentin was coming so fast,” Moreno said. “The radio had come out of my ear, so it was my fault to not have that information. When I saw him, I was like, ‘What’s happening?’ but it was too late.”

It unfolded in a flash at the end of an intense effort that left him cross-eyed. Nine out of 10 times, Moser would win that duel with Brambilla, but little did he know that Trentin countered out of a four-man chasing group. The big Italian came barreling into view on the TV screens in the final 600m, but without his earpiece, Moser never saw him coming.

“We came into the last kilometer together, but I knew that I was probably faster, so I said ‘Just wait, wait, wait,’” he said. “But if I knew that Trentin was coming, I would maybe have started the sprint earlier, and maybe Brambilla would have beat me.”

The close call was the latest chapter in Cannondale’s quest for a stage win during this Giro.

Moser, 25, arrived in top form with freedom to chase his first career Giro win, and with third in stage 8, and sixth in the opening prologue, a rider with his pedigree and ambition knows second doesn’t rate.

“When you’re riding good like I am, second is not good,” he said. “The important thing is to win the race.”

Cannondale’s been trying to squeeze a win out of this Giro. Without a pure sprinter, the team’s been taking its chances in breakaways, always a casino. Nate Brown was fourth in stage 10, Joe Dombrowski has been on the attack across the high mountains, and Rigoberto Urán has punched into the top-10 three times.

The Giro’s also been a rough ride for Urán, who fell ill midway through the Giro. The Colombian came with podium ambitions, but struggled in both decisive time trials, and pedals into the final weekend hoping to secure a top-10.

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Editors’ Picks: U.S. Pro road nationals http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/editors-picks-u-s-pro-road-nationals_407583 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/editors-picks-u-s-pro-road-nationals_407583#comments Thu, 26 May 2016 21:45:26 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407583

Megan Guarnier (Boels Dolmans) won the 2015 USA Cycling pro women's road championship with a bike throw over Coryn Rivera (UnitedHealthcare). Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Who will win U.S. Pro nationals? Our experts name their favorites for the TTs and road races in Winston-Salem.

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Megan Guarnier (Boels Dolmans) won the 2015 USA Cycling pro women's road championship with a bike throw over Coryn Rivera (UnitedHealthcare). Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Here are our rapid-fire predictions for the men’s and women’s TT and road races at U.S. Pro nationals. The VeloNews editorial staff will make predictions for major races throughout the season.

John Bradley, editor in chief
TT picks:
– Kristin Armstrong
– Taylor Phinney
Road race picks:
– Megan Guarnier
– Alex Howes

Armstrong owns American women’s TTs until further notice. I just don’t see anyone beating her. Phinney was fastest American in the TT at worlds last fall and rode on BMC’s world championship TTT squad. He’s still not at his best, but he doesn’t have to be.

The punchy course is good for Guarnier, and she manages to win even on courses that aren’t. Plus, since she already booked her ticket to Rio last fall, I would imagine she’d like to be able to go in there as the national champ. Alex Howes is a strong one-day rider coming off a nice rest after a big spring. And he was fourth last year. I think he can put it all together this weekend.

Spencer Powlison, news director
TT picks:
– Evelyn Stevens
– Taylor Phinney
Road race picks:
– Coryn Rivera
– Evan Huffman

Yes, I know Armstrong is the odds-on favorite, but Stevens is the world hour record holder, so that counts for something, right? Phinney is the comeback kid — it’s been a couple years coming, but this year he’ll finally get to wear that stars-and-stripes skinsuit after he wins it.

The nationals road race always surprises me, and with a new course this year, I expect it to be even more unpredictable. Rivera is riding quite well, but I think her sprint will be decisive in what will likely be a cagey race. Similarly, the men’s race often ends up dominated by negative tactics, and I think Huffman will benefit from a stalemate between the WorldTour guys, which always seems to be a factor.

Chris Case, managing editor
TT picks:
– Kristen Armstrong
– Taylor Phinney
Road race picks:
– Megan Guarnier
– Kiel Reijnen

Armstrong is the machine. Phinney will avenge his third-place finish behind Andrew Talansky at the Tour of California time trial.

Guarnier is not just the fastest American at the moment, but one of the fastest and on-form women in the world. Kiel for the win. Perhaps his time has finally come, and his skill-set matches up well with what looks to be a punchy course.

Dan Cavallari, tech editor
TT picks:
– Taylor Phinney
– Kristin Armstrong
Road race picks:
– Megan Guarnier
– Brent Bookwalter

Is there anyone better than Armstrong? Is there anyone with more experience? I think not. And with a trip to Rio on the line, look for the veteran to punch her ticket. Go Phinney! A long time trial and no Talansky to compete with spells good things for the Boulderite.

Guarnier is already good to go for Rio, and the course plays to her strengths. Coryn Rivera will give her a run for her money if the finish is fast and crowded, but Guarnier will show why she’s the defending national champ. The men’s race is a tough one to call, since there are so many favorites. Bookwalter won’t have much support, but he’s got good legs. In a race that seems like it’s anyone’s to win, Bookwalter’s got as good a shot as any of the top favorites, but look out for Phinney and Kiel Reijnen.

Kristen Legan, associate editor
TT picks:
– Kristin Armstrong
– Taylor Phinney
Road race picks:
– Coryn Rivera
– Kiel Reijnen

This is a no-brainer. Armstrong wouldn’t jump back into racing if she didn’t think she could win. The two-time Olympic gold medalist has been racing strong this spring and is looking to solidify her ticket to Rio. While I don’t think Armstrong can be taken down, I’d love to see Evelyn Stevens pull an upset on the day. Phinney proved he was back to fighting shape at the Amgen Tour of California’s time trial stage last week. Fresh legs and a focused agenda at the national championships should help put Phinney back on the top step of the podium.

Megan Guarnier and Evie Stevens will be tough to top as the two Boels – Dolmans teammates and friends work really well together. But Coryn will have a whole team behind her, keeping her safe and protected for a fast finish. Her sprinting power is hard to match and the tiny rider has proven her climbing abilities, finishing just behind Marianna Vos and Evie Stevens at the Tour of California’s hilly first stage. Whoever crosses the line first, this is going to be the most exciting race of the weekend. I really, really hope Reijnen takes the win this year. After last year’s heartbreaking puncture in the last few kilometers, the nicest rider in the peloton is due for some luck this year. It would also be killer to see the spry Alex Howes cross the line first if Reijnen isn’t there.

Dane Cash, web editor and reporter
TT picks:
– Kristin Armstrong
– Taylor Phinney
Road race picks:
– Megan Guarnier
– Taylor Phinney

Armstrong’s excellent ride in the Women’s Amgen Tour would suggest that she’s on very good form right now — and Kristin Armstrong on good form should be unbeatable in the time trial. Nobody on this start list has the TT chops of a healthy Taylor Phinney, and like Armstrong, he showed in the Amgen Tour that he’s feeling strong right now.

Guarnier is a cut above the competition right now. She is not only fresh off a big win in California; she is also leading the entire Women’s WorldTour at the moment. That makes her a favorite in North Carolina. Phinney has a great shot at winning two national titles if he can take advantage of the technical road race course and put in a timely attack. And even if he doesn’t, he also has one of the best finishing kicks of anyone in the field, though he may not get to show it that often when riding on the WorldTour.

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Chaves racing for pink — and a special surprise http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/chaves-racing-for-pink-and-a-special-surprise_407528 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/chaves-racing-for-pink-and-a-special-surprise_407528#comments Thu, 26 May 2016 17:35:20 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407528

Esteban Chaves is a fan favorite at the Giro d'Italia. Photo: Rupert Guinness

Orica team backer says he might have a special prize for Chaves, a rider he praises for his character, positive attitude, and gratitude.

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Esteban Chaves is a fan favorite at the Giro d'Italia. Photo: Rupert Guinness

PINEROLO, Italy (VN) — A special prize awaits Esteban Chaves, pending his strong Giro d’Italia showing that will all come to an end on Sunday. And it is not necessarily the race winner’s pink jersey.

Although, if Chaves, 26, can take that from the current race leader Steven Kruijswijk during the Giro’s final two mountain stages through the Alps on Friday and Saturday, rest assured the diminutive Colombian can expect to be flooded with as many gifts and rewards as he will be with plaudits.

But within the ‘family’ that his Orica – GreenEdge team has become, since the Bogota rider started riding for them in 2014, there may be a secret bonus reward from the Australian WorldTour team’s owner, Australian businessman Gerry Ryan.

Ryan, whose funding has pretty much kept the team going since its debut in 2012, has a penchant for unique ways to recognize benchmark achievements. In 2011, Ryan gave Cadel Evans a yellow Cadillac after he became the first Australian to win the Tour de France — not a sponsor’s gesture to Evans, as he then rode for BMC — but as a fellow Australian and backer of Australian cycling.

Asked if such a bonus awaits Chaves, who won stage 14 to Corvara in the Dolomites and was still placed second overall at three minutes to Kruijswijk after Thursday’s stage 18 from Muggio to Pinerolo, Ryan laughed and then replied: “I can’t say. There is something sitting in a shed somewhere, but who knows. I won’t tell you the color of it.” Does the color hinge on his final place? “It certainly does,” said Ryan.

Chaves may not be Australian; but he has certainly become one of the most admired and loved figures within the Orica team. And his success so far — whether he wins the Giro or not — has seen him embraced back in Australia by a growing legion of fans.

Moves are afoot to take Chaves to Australia for the Tour Down Under next year when he will also make his Tour de France debut. The decision is yet to be locked in, but Ryan said, “Esteban wants to go and ride the Tour Down Under. I’m not letting a secret out here, but he wants to come to Australia. And it will probably suit him with the change — he will be at the Tour next year.”

Chaves is the “most humble” of all, says Ryan

The 2011 Tour de l’Avenir winner started with the Colombian Colombia – Coldeportes, based in Italy, so local fans flock daily to the Orica-GreenEdge team bus. It is no surprise considering how Chaves engages the world around him. In his team’s “Backstage Pass” videos, Chaves, a.k.a “Chavito” or “Chicho,” is anything but the ever-serious or aloof team leader, rather one who is refreshingly self-effacing and can skylark as good as any.

Day after day and despite the accumulating fatigue and pressure from the job of trying to win a grand tour, he smiles and waves whenever he exits the team bus. And that is whether his reason is to speak to the media — from Colombian to international outlets — team guests, or fans like those he met before Thursday’s start in Muggio after the infectiously enthusiastic call from a Colombian woman who, without hesitation, peered into the bus, urging Chaves to come out with calls of: “Chavito … Chavito.” Typically, “Chavito” appeared … for selfies, autographs, hand shakes, and a huge hug from an elderly woman.

How does Chaves stand out as an athlete and person? Ryan replied: “Probably the most humble … He just keeps thanking myself, Shayne Bannan [general manager] and ‘Whitey’ [head sports director Matt White] and the management for giving the opportunity and bringing him back for a career that wouldn’t have happened. He is such a happy kid … always smiling.” And Ryan, who has a variety of business enterprises and whose sponsorship of sport in Australia extends beyond cycling — including Australian rules football, rugby, horse racing, and basketball — has seen plenty of champs and chumps in his day.

Chaves is the real deal, say teammates

Chaves’s teammates, such as Australian Damien Howson, concur. “It’s been an exciting journey and rewarding to see how he is going and how much respect he has for his teammates,” said Howson. “It’s not a show. He legitimately means it from the bottom of his heart, which makes it even more a reason to give that extra 10 percent.”

Sam Bewley, Chaves’ New Zealand teammate whose work for him on stage 14 to Corvara earned huge praise from the Colombian, said his inspiration to dig so deep for Chaves goes beyond it being his job. “It’s not just about having faith in your leader. It’s about having a relationship your leader. We are all riding for a friend,” Bewley said. “Esteban is a great guy, everybody loves him … and we know him better than how the media know him, and the media love him.

“When you are working for someone who you really respect and who you like, and you have a personal relationship with, you push yourself that extra mile … not just to do a job but help out a mate.”

Canadian Svein Tuft, who has been around long enough in his 39 years, and has seen champions come and go, is taken as much by Chaves’s charm as his class as a rider. “Everyone sees him as a funny smiling guy, and that’s true. He’s enjoying life,” Tuft said, then adding: “But you don’t do what he’s done without being a scrapper.

“He’s a real tough guy on the bike, and he’s fighting for position, getting the right wheel. All in all, he’s really relaxed and calm.”

It is little wonder Ryan is so upbeat about how the Giro might end on Sunday for Chaves and his team. “If you look back at our history we’ve always come out to try and win some stages and get the pink jersey,” said Ryan of the team’s past focus on the Giro that it first raced in 2012. “This is a different tour.

“Esteban is sitting second. There are the high mountains and he is ready. He is in good shape.”

Will it take Chaves to win the Giro for Ryan to bring out and give him the special prize that “sitting in a shed?” Who knows. What is sure is that however Chaves does finish, there will be smiles all around.

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Can Kruijswijk defend in Giro’s Alpine pressure cooker? http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/size-isnt-everything-giro-finale-is-long-on-climbing_407526 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/news/size-isnt-everything-giro-finale-is-long-on-climbing_407526#comments Thu, 26 May 2016 16:41:39 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407526

The Giro's stages in the Dolomites provided plenty of action. Now, attention turns to the Alps, where two tough, short stages will decide the race. Photo: Iri Greco / BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

The Giro d'Italia's final standings will be decided in two short Alpine stages where Chaves, Valverde, and Nibali all promise to attack.

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The Giro's stages in the Dolomites provided plenty of action. Now, attention turns to the Alps, where two tough, short stages will decide the race. Photo: Iri Greco / BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

PINEROLO, Italy (VN) — Short mountain stages are exciting mountain stages, and the Giro d’Italia is set up for a shootout in the Alps.

Giro organizers have served up two short stages — 162km Friday and 134km Saturday — loaded with painful vertical (five first-category climbs) and two summit finales that should promise high-octane, unpredictable racing to keep the peloton and spectators on their toes.

“It’s madness, it’s absolutely madness,” said Orica – GreenEdge sport director Matt White of this weekend’s menu. “We are going to see even more explosions than we did [Tuesday]. If you’re on a bad day, 30 seconds isn’t going to be the difference.”

Short mountain stages are highly unpredictable and very hard to control. The GC captains can be quickly isolated, meaning the stage is reduced to a mano-a-mano battle to the line. Any sign of weakness can spell disaster, and anyone on a great day can make dramatic gains.

“Anything can happen, and I am going to go for it,” said Movistar’s Alejandro Valverde, third at 3:23. “It won’t be easy, but if I am in this Giro, it’s to try to win. I can’t say where I will attack.”

Valverde’s win in Tuesday’s frenetic stage provided a preview of what could be in store, when the GC favorites threw down early and isolated Orica’s Esteban Chaves.

That’s what Steven Kruijswijk’s pink jersey rivals will have to do: isolate him and then attack him.

Despite having never been in a leader’s jersey of a grand tour, the LottoNL – Jumbo captain is looking steady in the pink jersey, with a three-minute lead to Chaves. The Dutch rider looks to have the legs to fend off the inevitable attacks, but the question mark is how much help he will have once the road tilts upward. Enrico Battaglin rode with Kruijswijk on Thursday, but he cannot expect much more help, so defense will be the best offense.

“We should not overshoot anything, there is a danger in that. We have to stay sharp, and look at our rivals as if they are three seconds behind instead of three minutes,” said LottoNL – Jumbo sport director Addy Engels. “The main goal is to defend this position. He does not need to attack until Saturday on the last climb. If he feels he can drop them, then I will say, OK, you can have your chance. Not before that.”

Here’s what’s on tap: Friday’s 162km crosses this year’s high point at the 2,744 meter (9,003 feet) Colle dell’Angello (Cima Coppi) before ending up the “mini-Alpe d’Huez” in France at Risoul, 12.9km at 6.9 percent with 10 switchbacks. With the 20km-plus opening climb into France, it will be an easier stage to control, and will likely come down to attacks on the final climb.

Saturday’s 134km stage 20 Guillestre to Santa’Anna di Vinadio could be epic. The stage opens with the Cat. 1 Col de Vars topping out at 2,108m in the opening 19km. That’s followed up by the Cat. 1 Col de la Bonette at 2,715m at 63km and the Cat. 1 Colle delle Lombarda at 2,350m at 123.7km. After a sharp descent, it’s a quick, punchy climb to the finale. It should be a full-on shootout right from the moment the flag is dropped.

No one is riding for the podium, at least not yet. Chaves has promised to attack, and surprisingly, so has Vincenzo Nibali, fourth at 4:30 back. The Italian has struggled, but vows to go down swinging.

“If I have legs, I will attack,” Nibali said. Astana manager Giuseppe Martinelli added, “I always believe in Vincenzo. A big champion is always capable of anything. These are the two decisive stages in this Giro, and everything is possible.”

The dark horse is Katusha’s Ilnur Zakarin, fifth at 4:50 back. After crashing and losing time in the Chianti race against the clock, Zakarin once again is looking sharp.

It will all come down to Kruijswijk. If he can follow the attacks, the pink jersey will be his. If he cannot, he still has a comfortable lead to manage, but he falters early on, especially in Saturday’s stage, it could be anyone’s race. After riding through the Giro’s longest stage Thursday, he sounds ready for battle.

“Only the last climb did I have to do it by myself, although I was never in trouble,” Kruijswijk said Thursday. “I’m getting closer every day to winning the Giro. Tomorrow it looks like a good stage for me. I like long climbs. Maybe I can do something. After finishing second three times, I’d like a stage win as well, but first, I’ll defend the pink jersey.”

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Trentin thrills with Giro stage 18 win http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/race-report/trentin-thrills-with-giro-stage-18-win_407505 http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/05/race-report/trentin-thrills-with-giro-stage-18-win_407505#comments Thu, 26 May 2016 15:02:11 +0000 http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=407505

Matteo Trentin made his way into the day's big breakaway and came away with a win in the Giro's stage 18 after chasing down the two leaders in the closing kilometer. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

Matteo Trentin chases furiously to reel in a lead duo in the final kilometer then blasts past to victory.

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Matteo Trentin made his way into the day's big breakaway and came away with a win in the Giro's stage 18 after chasing down the two leaders in the closing kilometer. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

The Giro d’Italia afforded more surprises Thursday as a steep, final cobbled climb seemingly set up a two-man sprint, but Matteo Trentin charged from behind to snatch an unexpected victory in Pinerolo, Italy. His Etixx – Quick-Step teammate Gianluca Brambilla sat patiently on Moreno Moser’s wheel in the final kilometer of stage 18. The Cannondale rider wasn’t ready for Trentin to blaze past in the final 200 meters to claim his first career Giro stage win. He settled for second while Brambilla finished third.

The top GC riders finished well behind in the 244km stage, but there was no change in the overall standings.

“It was beautiful because I came into the Giro with an objective to win a stage,” said Trentin. “I was sure that sooner or later, a stage for me would come. … Today was perfect. The breakaway can go, and I found really good legs on the climb. I had to go with my tempo, just a little under my limit, not to explode.”

Stage 18, top 10

  • 1. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, in 5:25:34
  • 2. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 3. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :00
  • 4. Sacha MODOLO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at :20
  • 5. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :30
  • 6. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, at :34
  • 7. Matteo BUSATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 1:10
  • 8. Christian KNEES, TEAM SKY, at 1:16
  • 9. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 1:24
  • 10. Davide MALACARNE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 4:28

 

Top-10 overall

  • 1. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, in 73:50:37
  • 2. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:00
  • 3. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 3:23
  • 4. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 4:43
  • 5. Ilnur ZAKARIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at 4:50
  • 6. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, at 5:34
  • 7. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 7:57
  • 8. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 8:53
  • 9. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 10:05
  • 10. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, at 11:15

 

After only six kilometers, the peloton broke up, and a big escape of 23 riders formed. About 16km later, the gap was more than five minutes to the peloton. Their lead continued to grow — up to about 14 minutes at one point.

Along the way, the stage passed through Torino, which will host the Giro’s final stage on Sunday.

Pavel Brutt (Tinkoff) and Oliver Le Gac (FDJ) attacked the break with about 40km to go, disrupting the group’s organization. Soon, Brutt was alone off the front.

The Russian had a lead of about 16 seconds on the first passage through Pinerolo, ahead of the day’s only categorized climb, a category 2 ascent of Pramartino. Moser attacked toward the top of the steep, uncategorized cobbled climb out of Pinerolo, but with 25km to go, the large break congealed for a moment before facing the day’s big climb.

Behind in the peloton, Kruijswijk had no problem with the first passage of the steep, cobblestone climb.

As the break began to climb, Moser and Brambilla escaped on the 4.6km ascent, which topped out about 19.5km from the finish. They went over the top with a 28-second lead on Ivan Rovny (Tinkoff) and Nikias Arndt (Giant – Alpecin).

With 10km to go, the lead duo was 36 seconds up the road from four chasers — Sacha Modolo (Lampre – Merida) and Trentin had caught Rovny and Arndt. The peloton, more than 12 minutes in arrears, was too far behind to contest the stage win. Five kilometers later, Moser and Brambilla’s lead had been whittled down to 15 seconds on the chase.

Before the finish, the route afforded one final trip up the short, cobbled Via dei Principi d’Acaja that riders saw on the first trip through the finish town. Brambilla took the lead into the base of the climb, which ramped up at 20 percent. Behind, Rovny botched the left-hand corner and lost touch with the chase.

Moser attacked on the cobbles, but Brambilla had a reply. Despite their best efforts, the Italian duo went over the top and into the final two kilometers together.

With one kilometer left, Moser was on the front, leading out the sprint. He looked surprisingly calm, despite a charging Trentin who was in sight behind. Brambilla played the perfect teammate role, sitting uncooperatively on Moser’s wheel.

Trentin caught the duo at full speed with about 200 kilometers left, and Moser could not respond. “It was key that I saw the stage finish today [with one lap to go],” Trentin added. “Having Gianluca at the front, I didn’t have to ride with [Nikias] Arndt, [Sacha] Modolo and [Ivan] Rovny. Eventually, I was able to attack them and make it across. I don’t think Moreno even saw me coming from behind but Gianluca knew as he was told via radio to stop pulling because I was right there.”

Among the GC riders, Kruijswijk looked unflappable on the steep pitches of Via dei Principi d’Acaja. Valverde led over the top but he didn’t have a significant lead. The Spaniard took the sprint to the line but it was essentially a stalemate at the end of the Giro’s longest day.

On Friday the race returns to the mountains with a 162km run from Pinerolo that features the Cima Coppi, the highest climb of the Giro, which is the Colle d’Agnello, 2,744 meters (9,002 feet) above sea level. That summit comes 55.6km from the finish in Risoul, a 12.8km, category 1 uphill finish.

Stage 18 results

  • 1. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, in 5:25:34
  • 2. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 3. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :00
  • 4. Sacha MODOLO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at :20
  • 5. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :30
  • 6. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, at :34
  • 7. Matteo BUSATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 1:10
  • 8. Christian KNEES, TEAM SKY, at 1:16
  • 9. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 1:24
  • 10. Davide MALACARNE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 4:28
  • 11. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 4:28
  • 12. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 4:28
  • 13. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, at 5:07
  • 14. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, at 5:23
  • 15. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 5:40
  • 16. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, at 5:40
  • 17. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, at 5:40
  • 18. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 7:34
  • 19. Gianfranco ZILIOLI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 7:34
  • 20. Albert TIMMER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 7:51
  • 21. Andrei SOLOMENNIKOV, GAZ, at 8:07
  • 22. Roger KLUGE, IAM CYCLING, at 8:38
  • 23. Genki YAMAMOTO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 13:02
  • 24. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 13:24
  • 25. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 13:24
  • 26. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, at 13:24
  • 27. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 13:24
  • 28. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 13:24
  • 29. Ilnur ZAKARIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at 13:24
  • 30. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 13:24
  • 31. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 13:24
  • 32. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 13:24
  • 33. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, at 13:24
  • 34. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 13:24
  • 35. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 13:24
  • 36. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 13:24
  • 37. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, at 13:36
  • 38. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, at 13:41
  • 39. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 13:41
  • 40. Maxime MONFORT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 13:41
  • 41. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 13:41
  • 42. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 13:41
  • 43. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 13:41
  • 44. Andre Fernando S. Martins CARDOSO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 13:41
  • 45. Hubert DUPONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 13:41
  • 46. Igor ANTON HERNANDEZ, DIMENSION DATA, at 14:24
  • 47. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 14:28
  • 48. Rein TAARAMAE, TEAM KATUSHA, at 14:49
  • 49. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, at 15:51
  • 50. Manuele BOARO, TINKOFF, at 15:51
  • 51. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, DIMENSION DATA, at 15:51
  • 52. Pawel POLJANSKI, TINKOFF, at 15:51
  • 53. Andrey ZEITS, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 15:51
  • 54. Pim LIGTHART, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 17:07
  • 55. Marcel WYSS, IAM CYCLING, at 18:11
  • 56. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 18:11
  • 57. Pavel KOCHETKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 18:11
  • 58. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 18:11
  • 59. José HERRADA LOPEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 18:11
  • 60. Pieter SERRY, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 18:11
  • 61. Amets TXURRUKA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 18:22
  • 62. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, at 20:48
  • 63. Jose Joaquin ROJAS GIL, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 21:27
  • 64. Viacheslav KUZNETSOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 21:27
  • 65. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, at 21:27
  • 66. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 21:27
  • 67. Bram TANKINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 21:27
  • 68. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 21:37
  • 69. Filippo POZZATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 23:22
  • 70. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 23:22
  • 71. Jay Robert THOMSON, DIMENSION DATA, at 23:22
  • 72. Adam HANSEN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 23:22
  • 73. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 23:22
  • 74. Damien HOWSON, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 23:22
  • 75. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 23:22
  • 76. Sonny COLBRELLI, BARDIANI CSF, at 23:22
  • 77. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, at 23:22
  • 78. Giulio CICCONE, BARDIANI CSF, at 23:22
  • 79. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, at 23:22
  • 80. Giacomo NIZZOLO, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 23:22
  • 81. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, at 23:22
  • 82. Davide FORMOLO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 23:22
  • 83. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 23:22
  • 84. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 23:22
  • 85. Marco COLEDAN, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 23:22
  • 86. Matteo TOSATTO, TINKOFF, at 23:22
  • 87. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, at 23:22
  • 88. Laurent DIDIER, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 23:22
  • 89. Bakhtiyar KOZHATAYEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 23:22
  • 90. Eugenio ALAFACI, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 23:22
  • 91. Vegard Stake LAENGEN, IAM CYCLING, at 23:22
  • 92. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 23:22
  • 93. Martijn KEIZER, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 23:22
  • 94. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, at 23:22
  • 95. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 23:22
  • 96. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 23:22
  • 97. Guillaume BONNAFOND, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 23:22
  • 98. Cheng JI, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 23:22
  • 99. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 23:22
  • 100. Kristian SBARAGLI, DIMENSION DATA, at 23:22
  • 101. Carlos VERONA QUINTANILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 23:22
  • 102. Tom STAMSNIJDER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 23:22
  • 103. Jesus HERNANDEZ BLAZQUEZ, TINKOFF, at 23:22
  • 104. Cristian RODRIGUEZ MARTIN, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 23:22
  • 105. Chad HAGA, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 23:22
  • 106. Simone PETILLI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 23:22
  • 107. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 23:22
  • 108. Riccardo ZOIDL, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 23:22
  • 109. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, at 23:22
  • 110. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, at 23:22
  • 111. Heinrich HAUSSLER, IAM CYCLING, at 23:22
  • 112. Murilo Antonio FISCHER, FDJ, at 23:22
  • 113. Rory SUTHERLAND, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 23:22
  • 114. Carlos Alberto BETANCUR GOMEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 23:22
  • 115. Manuel QUINZIATO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 23:22
  • 116. Benoît VAUGRENARD, FDJ, at 23:22
  • 117. Ian BOSWELL, TEAM SKY, at 23:22
  • 118. Manuele MORI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 23:22
  • 119. Eros CAPECCHI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 23:22
  • 120. Evgeny PETROV, TINKOFF, at 23:22
  • 121. Maxim BELKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 23:22
  • 122. Twan CASTELIJNS, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 23:22
  • 123. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, at 23:22
  • 124. Egor SILIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at 23:22
  • 125. Jelle VANENDERT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 23:22
  • 126. Anton VOROBYEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 23:22
  • 127. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 23:22
  • 128. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 23:22
  • 129. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 23:22
  • 130. Aleksey RYBALKIN, GAZ, at 23:22
  • 131. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, at 23:22
  • 132. Primož ROGLIC, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 23:22
  • 133. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 23:22
  • 134. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, at 23:22
  • 135. Hugo HOULE, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 23:22
  • 136. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, at 23:22
  • 137. Biel KADRI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 23:22
  • 138. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 23:22
  • 139. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 23:22
  • 140. Francesco Manuel BONGIORNO, BARDIANI CSF, at 23:22
  • 141. Riccardo STACCHIOTTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 23:22
  • 142. Grega BOLE, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 23:22
  • 143. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 23:22
  • 144. Philip DEIGNAN, TEAM SKY, at 23:22
  • 145. Manuel SENNI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 23:22
  • 146. Sam BEWLEY, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 23:22
  • 147. Songezo JIM, DIMENSION DATA, at 23:22
  • 148. Ignatas KONOVALOVAS, FDJ, at 23:22
  • 149. Mickael DELAGE, FDJ, at 23:22
  • 150. Roberto FERRARI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 23:22
  • 151. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, at 23:22
  • 152. Alexander PORSEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 23:22
  • 153. Artem OVECHKIN, GAZ, at 23:22
  • 154. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, at 23:22
  • 155. Jack BOBRIDGE, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 23:22
  • 156. Arnaud COURTEILLE, FDJ, at 23:22
  • 157. Alexander SEROV, GAZ, at 23:22
  • 158. Svein TUFT, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 23:22
  • 159. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 24:43
  • 160. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 24:43
  • 161. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 26:38
  • DNS Manuel BELLETTI, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST

 

General classification

  • 1. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, in 73:50:37
  • 2. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:00
  • 3. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 3:23
  • 4. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 4:43
  • 5. Ilnur ZAKARIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at 4:50
  • 6. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, at 5:34
  • 7. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 7:57
  • 8. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 8:53
  • 9. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 10:05
  • 10. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, at 11:15
  • 11. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 13:53
  • 12. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 16:08
  • 13. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 21:04
  • 14. Hubert DUPONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 22:30
  • 15. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, at 24:41
  • 16. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 27:15
  • 17. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, at 29:23
  • 18. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 30:11
  • 19. Maxime MONFORT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 30:43
  • 20. Andre Fernando S. Martins CARDOSO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 31:53
  • 21. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 34:45
  • 22. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 40:49
  • 23. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 42:08
  • 24. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, at 43:06
  • 25. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 48:26
  • 26. Davide FORMOLO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 52:33
  • 27. Andrey ZEITS, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 52:57
  • 28. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 53:45
  • 29. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, at 1:00:20
  • 30. Igor ANTON HERNANDEZ, DIMENSION DATA, at 1:00:42
  • 31. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 1:01:54
  • 32. Pavel KOCHETKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:03:08
  • 33. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, at 1:06:51
  • 34. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:07:25
  • 35. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, at 1:11:42
  • 36. Rein TAARAMAE, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:13:40
  • 37. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:14:42
  • 38. Davide MALACARNE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 1:18:26
  • 39. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:21:52
  • 40. Pawel POLJANSKI, TINKOFF, at 1:23:50
  • 41. Manuele BOARO, TINKOFF, at 1:28:22
  • 42. Carlos VERONA QUINTANILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 1:28:56
  • 43. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 1:29:04
  • 44. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, DIMENSION DATA, at 1:30:28
  • 45. Matteo BUSATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 1:32:43
  • 46. Riccardo ZOIDL, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 1:35:25
  • 47. Jose Joaquin ROJAS GIL, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 1:36:07
  • 48. Marcel WYSS, IAM CYCLING, at 1:41:28
  • 49. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 1:42:51
  • 50. Egor SILIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:43:44
  • 51. Damien HOWSON, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 1:48:17
  • 52. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:52:42
  • 53. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, at 1:52:47
  • 54. Jesus HERNANDEZ BLAZQUEZ, TINKOFF, at 1:56:23
  • 55. Guillaume BONNAFOND, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 1:58:49
  • 56. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 1:59:58
  • 57. Bram TANKINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 2:00:45
  • 58. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, at 2:04:08
  • 59. Amets TXURRUKA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 2:05:34
  • 60. Giulio CICCONE, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:05:39
  • 61. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, at 2:09:23
  • 62. Christian KNEES, TEAM SKY, at 2:10:11
  • 63. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 2:10:40
  • 64. Manuel SENNI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:12:22
  • 65. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 2:16:49
  • 66. José HERRADA LOPEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:17:53
  • 67. Primož ROGLIC, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 2:17:58
  • 68. Manuele MORI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:18:50
  • 69. Carlos Alberto BETANCUR GOMEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:19:09
  • 70. Pieter SERRY, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 2:20:30
  • 71. Sacha MODOLO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:20:43
  • 72. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, at 2:23:36
  • 73. Simone PETILLI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:24:13
  • 74. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:24:16
  • 75. Laurent DIDIER, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:25:39
  • 76. Bakhtiyar KOZHATAYEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 2:29:52
  • 77. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, at 2:31:48
  • 78. Evgeny PETROV, TINKOFF, at 2:32:11
  • 79. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:32:26
  • 80. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:33:29
  • 81. Kristian SBARAGLI, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:34:29
  • 82. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:34:38
  • 83. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, at 2:36:31
  • 84. Hugo HOULE, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:37:44
  • 85. Sonny COLBRELLI, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:37:47
  • 86. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, at 2:37:58
  • 87. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:38:04
  • 88. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:38:28
  • 89. Chad HAGA, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:38:30
  • 90. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:38:54
  • 91. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:40:41
  • 92. Jelle VANENDERT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:42:10
  • 93. Cristian RODRIGUEZ MARTIN, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:42:55
  • 94. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, at 2:43:48
  • 95. Adam HANSEN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:44:04
  • 96. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 2:45:00
  • 97. Eugenio ALAFACI, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:45:58
  • 98. Rory SUTHERLAND, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:47:00
  • 99. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:47:47
  • 100. Ian BOSWELL, TEAM SKY, at 2:48:01
  • 101. Matteo TOSATTO, TINKOFF, at 2:48:27
  • 102. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:48:33
  • 103. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:48:41
  • 104. Francesco Manuel BONGIORNO, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:48:47
  • 105. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:49:17
  • 106. Eros CAPECCHI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 2:49:52
  • 107. Heinrich HAUSSLER, IAM CYCLING, at 2:50:29
  • 108. Giacomo NIZZOLO, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:53:31
  • 109. Philip DEIGNAN, TEAM SKY, at 2:54:17
  • 110. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:56:15
  • 111. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:57:02
  • 112. Vegard Stake LAENGEN, IAM CYCLING, at 2:57:54
  • 113. Twan CASTELIJNS, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 2:58:04
  • 114. Filippo POZZATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:58:34
  • 115. Benoît VAUGRENARD, FDJ, at 2:59:15
  • 116. Maxim BELKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 3:00:24
  • 117. Manuel QUINZIATO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:01:13
  • 118. Anton VOROBYEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 3:01:32
  • 119. Gianfranco ZILIOLI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:02:32
  • 120. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:03:50
  • 121. Martijn KEIZER, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 3:04:03
  • 122. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 3:04:35
  • 123. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 3:05:43
  • 124. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 3:06:14
  • 125. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 3:08:41
  • 126. Pim LIGTHART, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:09:26
  • 127. Andrei SOLOMENNIKOV, GAZ, at 3:09:48
  • 128. Alexander SEROV, GAZ, at 3:11:17
  • 129. Marco COLEDAN, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 3:11:45
  • 130. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 3:12:55
  • 131. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:13:06
  • 132. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 3:13:49
  • 133. Roberto FERRARI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 3:17:21
  • 134. Albert TIMMER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 3:17:25
  • 135. Viacheslav KUZNETSOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 3:17:56
  • 136. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, at 3:19:06
  • 137. Ignatas KONOVALOVAS, FDJ, at 3:21:18
  • 138. Grega BOLE, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:21:44
  • 139. Roger KLUGE, IAM CYCLING, at 3:22:41
  • 140. Arnaud COURTEILLE, FDJ, at 3:22:49
  • 141. Aleksey RYBALKIN, GAZ, at 3:23:56
  • 142. Sam BEWLEY, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:23:58
  • 143. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 3:24:56
  • 144. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:25:36
  • 145. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:25:59
  • 146. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:26:05
  • 147. Tom STAMSNIJDER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 3:28:10
  • 148. Songezo JIM, DIMENSION DATA, at 3:29:42
  • 149. Alexander PORSEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 3:31:18
  • 150. Artem OVECHKIN, GAZ, at 3:32:18
  • 151. Svein TUFT, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:32:44
  • 152. Biel KADRI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 3:33:28
  • 153. Mickael DELAGE, FDJ, at 3:35:20
  • 154. Jay Robert THOMSON, DIMENSION DATA, at 3:36:43
  • 155. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:37:39
  • 156. Genki YAMAMOTO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:38:45
  • 157. Murilo Antonio FISCHER, FDJ, at 3:39:39
  • 158. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:40:04
  • 159. Cheng JI, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 3:53:22
  • 160. Riccardo STACCHIOTTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:54:43
  • 161. Jack BOBRIDGE, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 3:58:31

 

Points classification

  • 1. Giacomo NIZZOLO, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 185 points
  • 2. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 141 points
  • 3. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 137 points
  • 4. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, 127 points
  • 5. Sacha MODOLO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 126 points
  • 6. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, 83 points
  • 7. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 83 points
  • 8. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 76 points
  • 9. Alexander PORSEV, TEAM KATUSHA, 62 points
  • 10. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 61 points
  • 11. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, 57 points
  • 12. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 52 points
  • 13. Ilnur ZAKARIN, TEAM KATUSHA, 51 points
  • 14. Roger KLUGE, IAM CYCLING, 50 points
  • 15. Giulio CICCONE, BARDIANI CSF, 47 points
  • 16. Anton VOROBYEV, TEAM KATUSHA, 46 points
  • 17. Sonny COLBRELLI, BARDIANI CSF, 46 points
  • 18. Kristian SBARAGLI, DIMENSION DATA, 44 points
  • 19. Pim LIGTHART, LOTTO SOUDAL, 40 points
  • 20. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, 39 points
  • 21. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, 39 points
  • 22. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 38 points
  • 23. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 38 points
  • 24. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 36 points
  • 25. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 35 points
  • 26. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, 33 points
  • 27. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 30 points
  • 28. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 30 points
  • 29. Vegard Stake LAENGEN, IAM CYCLING, 29 points
  • 30. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 28 points
  • 31. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, 28 points
  • 32. Primož ROGLIC, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 27 points
  • 33. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, 24 points
  • 34. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, 24 points
  • 35. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, 23 points
  • 36. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, 21 points
  • 37. Pieter SERRY, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 20 points
  • 38. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, 20 points
  • 39. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 20 points
  • 40. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 20 points
  • 41. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 19 points
  • 42. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, 17 points
  • 43. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, 17 points
  • 44. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, 16 points
  • 45. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, 16 points
  • 46. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, 16 points
  • 47. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, 16 points
  • 48. Amets TXURRUKA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 16 points
  • 49. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 16 points
  • 50. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, 15 points
  • 51. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, 14 points
  • 52. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, 14 points
  • 53. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 14 points
  • 54. Mickael DELAGE, FDJ, 14 points
  • 55. Marco COLEDAN, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 13 points
  • 56. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, 13 points
  • 57. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, 12 points
  • 58. Matteo BUSATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 12 points
  • 59. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, 12 points
  • 60. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 12 points
  • 61. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 11 points
  • 62. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, 11 points
  • 63. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, 10 points
  • 64. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 10 points
  • 65. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, 10 points
  • 66. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, 10 points
  • 67. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 10 points
  • 68. Heinrich HAUSSLER, IAM CYCLING, 9 points
  • 69. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 8 points
  • 70. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, 8 points
  • 71. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 7 points
  • 72. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 7 points
  • 73. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 7 points
  • 74. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 6 points
  • 75. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 6 points
  • 76. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 5 points
  • 77. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 5 points
  • 78. Viacheslav KUZNETSOV, TEAM KATUSHA, 4 points
  • 79. Biel KADRI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 4 points
  • 80. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 3 points
  • 81. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 3 points
  • 82. Christian KNEES, TEAM SKY, 3 points
  • 83. Laurent DIDIER, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 3 points
  • 84. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 3 points
  • 85. Ignatas KONOVALOVAS, FDJ, 3 points
  • 86. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 3 points
  • 87. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 2 points
  • 88. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 2 points
  • 89. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 2 points
  • 90. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, 2 points
  • 91. Eugenio ALAFACI, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 2 points
  • 92. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 2 points
  • 93. Davide MALACARNE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 1 points
  • 94. Manuele BOARO, TINKOFF, 1 points
  • 95. Riccardo ZOIDL, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 1 points
  • 96. Roberto FERRARI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 1 points
  • 97. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, 1 points
  • 98. Arnaud COURTEILLE, FDJ, 1 points

 

Mountains classification

  • 1. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 134 points
  • 2. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, 72 points
  • 3. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, 69 points
  • 4. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, 61 points
  • 5. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, 54 points
  • 6. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, 50 points
  • 7. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 42 points
  • 8. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, 41 points
  • 9. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, 36 points
  • 10. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 31 points
  • 11. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, 27 points
  • 12. Giulio CICCONE, BARDIANI CSF, 27 points
  • 13. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, 26 points
  • 14. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 23 points
  • 15. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 21 points
  • 16. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 20 points
  • 17. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, 19 points
  • 18. Ilnur ZAKARIN, TEAM KATUSHA, 18 points
  • 19. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, 18 points
  • 20. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 18 points
  • 21. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, 17 points
  • 22. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 16 points
  • 23. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, 15 points
  • 24. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 14 points
  • 25. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 13 points
  • 26. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, 13 points
  • 27. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, 12 points
  • 28. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, 11 points
  • 29. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 11 points
  • 30. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 9 points
  • 31. Manuele MORI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 9 points
  • 32. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 8 points
  • 33. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, 8 points
  • 34. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, 8 points
  • 35. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 8 points
  • 36. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 8 points
  • 37. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, 7 points
  • 38. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 7 points
  • 39. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 6 points
  • 40. Jose Joaquin ROJAS GIL, MOVISTAR TEAM, 6 points
  • 41. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 6 points
  • 42. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 6 points
  • 43. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 6 points
  • 44. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 6 points
  • 45. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 5 points
  • 46. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 4 points
  • 47. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, 4 points
  • 48. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 3 points
  • 49. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, 3 points
  • 50. Maxime MONFORT, LOTTO SOUDAL, 2 points
  • 51. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 2 points
  • 52. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 2 points
  • 53. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, 2 points
  • 54. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, 2 points
  • 55. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 1 points
  • 56. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 1 points
  • 57. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, 1 points
  • 58. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, 1 points
  • 59. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, 1 points

 

Youth classification

  • 1. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, in 73:58:34
  • 2. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, at 16:44
  • 3. Davide FORMOLO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 44:36
  • 4. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 53:57
  • 5. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:13:55
  • 6. Carlos VERONA QUINTANILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 1:20:59
  • 7. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, DIMENSION DATA, at 1:22:31
  • 8. Damien HOWSON, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 1:40:20
  • 9. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:44:45
  • 10. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, at 1:44:50
  • 11. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 1:52:01
  • 12. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, at 1:56:11
  • 13. Giulio CICCONE, BARDIANI CSF, at 1:57:42
  • 14. Manuel SENNI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:04:25
  • 15. Simone PETILLI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:16:16
  • 16. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:16:19
  • 17. Bakhtiyar KOZHATAYEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 2:21:55
  • 18. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:25:32
  • 19. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:26:41
  • 20. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, at 2:30:01
  • 21. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:30:07
  • 22. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:30:57
  • 23. Cristian RODRIGUEZ MARTIN, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:34:58
  • 24. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, at 2:35:51
  • 25. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:39:50
  • 26. Ian BOSWELL, TEAM SKY, at 2:40:04
  • 27. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:40:36
  • 28. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:49:05
  • 29. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:55:53
  • 30. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:56:38
  • 31. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 3:00:44
  • 32. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:05:09
  • 33. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, at 3:11:09
  • 34. Aleksey RYBALKIN, GAZ, at 3:15:59
  • 35. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 3:16:59
  • 36. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:18:02
  • 37. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:18:08
  • 38. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:29:42
  • 39. Genki YAMAMOTO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:30:48
  • 40. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:32:07
  • 41. Riccardo STACCHIOTTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:46:46

 

Teams classification

  • 1. Astana Pro Team, in 221:53:12
  • 2. Cannondale Pro Cycling Team, at 199:12:42
  • 3. Movistar Team, at 199:16:59
  • 4. Ag2R La Mondiale, at 199:20:19
  • 5. Team Sky, at 199:38:59
  • 6. Etixx – Quick Step, at 199:48:15
  • 7. Tinkoff, at 199:50:40
  • 8. Team Katusha, at 200:21:50
  • 9. Team Dimension Data, at 2:05:01
  • 10. Team Lotto Nl – Jumbo, at 2:07:36
  • 11. Lampre – Merida, at 2:23:44
  • 12. Bmc Racing Team, at 2:33:14
  • 13. Orica Greenedge, at 2:45:50
  • 14. Team Giant – Alpecin, at 3:18:09
  • 15. Trek Factory Racing, at 3:40:14
  • 16. Bardiani Csf, at 3:45:22
  • 17. Lotto Soudal, at 3:56:58
  • 18. Gazprom-Rusvelo, at 4:05:16
  • 19. Wilier Triestina – Southeast, at 4:57:51
  • 20. Iam Cycling, at 5:01:33
  • 21. Nippo – Vini Fantini, at 5:34:20
  • 22. Fdj, at 8:27:59

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