VeloNews.com http://velonews.competitor.com Competitive Cycling News, Race Results and Bike Reviews Sat, 23 Aug 2014 01:35:12 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 Danielson tips cap to a flying van Garderen, but no white flag yet http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/danielson-tips-cap-flying-van-garderen-white-flag-yet_342263 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/danielson-tips-cap-flying-van-garderen-white-flag-yet_342263#comments Sat, 23 Aug 2014 01:33:30 +0000 Matthew Beaudin http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342263

Garmin-Sharp's Tom Danielson is in fourth overall at the USA Pro Challenge, but knows it's a huge order now to overcome BMC Racing's Tejay van Garderen. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Tom Danielson lost five seconds on Friday into Breckenridge and sits in fourth overall, though he knows Tejay van Garderen will be tough to

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Garmin-Sharp's Tom Danielson is in fourth overall at the USA Pro Challenge, but knows it's a huge order now to overcome BMC Racing's Tejay van Garderen. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

BRECKENRIDGE, Colorado (VN) — The sky spit rain down in Woodland Park Friday morning. Of course it did, with the tall Hoosier Pass on tap, via Alma, North America’s highest incorporated town.

The peloton steeled itself for a cold day through the central Colorado mountains. It was time to suffer, and suffer they did. Tom Danielson in particular. The Garmin-Sharp rider lost five seconds on the day to race leader Tejay van Garderen (BMC Racing), and shivered his way through it. He now sits in fourth overall, 39 seconds down, heading into Saturday’s 16km Vail time trial.

“Just a real bike race out there. It was — we wanted guys in the break to go for the stage win. We missed the break a couple times and had to bring it back … then it became really cold and rainy. And sleeting or whatever,” Danielson said. “I was pretty much hypothermic the whole day. Just shivering. I was lucky I even rode all right in the final. I really suffered a lot today with the cold. And the last climb, you know, I didn’t want it to come down to the jump that it did, and it did, and those guys pulled away from me. I think they got a few seconds on me.

Danielson has another crack in Vail Saturday, in the short but rough uphill time trial. He’s close, but perhaps not close enough to van Garderen, a very good time trialist.

“I’m still right there. Tomorrow’s the time trial. I’m going to give it my all. Obviously Tejay’s super strong, and there’s nothing you can say about that. Fantastic performance by him, every day. So you can’t, I can’t really see too many people in the world, anyone in the world, beating him on a course like this,” Danielson said. “Just being there and trying to win every day is what I’m doing. You know, he’s fantastic. He’s riding so strong… He’s just so, so, so good, what are you doing to do?

Time is scarce now for opportunities. Garmin, notoriously aggressive, sees two more stages to claim its home race. “We’re obviously running pretty low on options here. We’ll see what Tom can do in the time trial. You never know in that situation. Tejay’s a pretty good time trialist. Tom’s no slouch,” Garmin’s Alex Howes said. “We’ll see what he can do there. That last day, it’s not hard enough to be a GC day, but it’s certainly hard enough to piss people off.”

The USA Pro Challenge may come at the tail end of a long season, but it’s hotly contested regardless.

“It’s always a hard race. We race every day. Obviously our team is pretty motivated. BMC is pretty motivated. Anybody with American interests like Cannondale and Trek, everybody shows up to race,” Howes said. “You could make the course easy every day and we’d still beat each other up.”

Danielson knows that much. He’s been trying to win this one for years, finishing third overall, behind van Garderen, last year.

“I love it. I mean it’s just, I just wish I could win,” he said, laughing. “But it’s a tough route for me every year. I just give it my all and I love doing it in front of these fans. They’re the best fans in the world and I’m going to continue to do it until maybe some day I win.”

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In cycling’s open arena, harsh words — and reactions http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/cyclings-open-arena-harsh-words-reactions_342188 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/cyclings-open-arena-harsh-words-reactions_342188#comments Sat, 23 Aug 2014 01:07:23 +0000 Matthew Beaudin http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342188

Tom Danielson crosses the finish line in Crested Butte earlier this week. In the Colorado Springs stage, he flipped off a jeering fan, one example this year of the relationship between the fans and riders in this all-access sport. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Fans can cheer, and jeer, riders easily. But where is the line crossed?

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Tom Danielson crosses the finish line in Crested Butte earlier this week. In the Colorado Springs stage, he flipped off a jeering fan, one example this year of the relationship between the fans and riders in this all-access sport. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

WOODLAND PARK, Colorado (VN) — A man leans into the road. Doper, he yells. You suck, he yells.

Doper. You suck.

Tom Danielson rides closer during a stage of the USA Pro Challenge in Colorado Springs, flips him the bird.

The moment catches a bit of social media fire, and, at once, perfectly crystalizes the gifts and curses of a sport that is struggling to find a grey area in a culture demanding black and white, and one that’s played out on open roads with fans close enough to be heard, loudly.

Danielson, an American rider for Garmin-Sharp, admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs as part of the United States Anti-Doping Agency’s investigation into Lance Armstrong.

Since then, riders who contributed to the investigation have been both lauded and lamented.

For one fan, and Colorado professional mountain biker, the fact Danielson is in the peloton at all is an insult. The fact that Danielson reacted is somewhat rare, though at this summer’s Tour de France Europcar’s Thomas Voeckler got off his bike to lambast a heckling fan, who then apologized. Incidents in years past have extended beyond words — Mark Cavendish has had urine thrown at him, and Lance Armstrong was spit upon on the open roads of France.

The issue raises a central question for a sport played out on open roads with thousands of fans, some of them feeling jilted. Is there such a thing as too much? Is it all part of the big show? Predictably, answers may vary.

“Professional athletes get heckled day in and day out…. I wasn’t telling him his momma was fat or anything,” said Kalan Beisel, who harangued Danielson on Thursday in Colorado Springs, to the point of prompting Danielson to extend a middle finger, mid-race. “I just called him a doper and told him he sucks. It was really simple … I don’t think it’s harsh at all. Personally I think he shouldn’t be racing in the peloton.”

Draconian? Maybe. But there isn’t much middle ground these days.

“Some guys will like you. Some guys will dislike you. Obviously Tommy D ran into some guy yesterday who wasn’t a major fan of his,” Garmin-Sharp director and former pro Robbie Hunter said. “I think, you know, he reacted in the wrong way. I think one of the biggest attractions to fans, and why they love the sport so much, is because they can be so close to the athletes. That obviously brings along the problem that the people who don’t like you can get in your face. Unfortunately the athletes themselves need to rise above the one or two bad apples on the side of road screaming at you, shouting at you, whatever. I know it’s difficult because nobody likes being told off, especially when they’re giving their maximum.”

Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies soigneur Jonathan Garcia, also a former pro rider, said that in Colorado, regarding Colorado riders such as Danielson, a number of things could prompt such an interaction.

“People have opinions on certain riders, and maybe that’s where it comes from. Some guys get more of that than other guys. I think you’re going to get that in any sport … it could stem from some of the doping stuff, it could be — who knows,” Garcia said. “I just don’t think it’s going to help his cause to react to someone like that. It’s part of the gig of being an athlete. You’re going to have people like you, people not like you … I know it sucks to hear stuff on the road, but they’re just making an assumption, usually. You just need to let it go.”

For his part, Danielson engaged in a bit of Twitter debate, but also apologized. “I apologize I lost my cool out there today. I appreciate all the incredible fan support out there which makes this race so incredible!” he said.

The sport rolled on the next day, its collective memory shortened by a drizzle and a stage over Hoosier Pass, into the ski town of Breckenridge. It was another day, and something else is always bound to happen in professional cycling. And it may be too much to expect perfection of men in an imperfect sport. At least SmartStop’s Michael Creed thought so.

“Tommy’s human, right? Your heart rate’s 180, 190. You react. What are you going to do, you know,” he wondered.

A day after the event, Danielson was brief on the matter. One tough moment, he said, didn’t outshine the other fans along the road.

“He’s not a fan. He’s a person — I don’t want to talk too much about it, but it’s a guy that’s devoted three years of internet hate toward me,” Danielson said.

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Majka’s Colorado roller coaster: ‘I don’t think I can win’ http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/majkas-colorado-rollercoaster-dont-think-can-win_342256 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/majkas-colorado-rollercoaster-dont-think-can-win_342256#comments Sat, 23 Aug 2014 00:48:33 +0000 Neal Rogers http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342256

Rafal Majka is likely to finish on the final podium, but will also likely leave without either a stage win or overall victory. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Though he’s sitting second overall, Rafal Majka has been frustrated by his inability to win in Colorado

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Rafal Majka is likely to finish on the final podium, but will also likely leave without either a stage win or overall victory. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

BRECKENRIDGE, Colorado (VN) — For the third time in four days, Rafal Majka crossed the finish line at the USA Pro Challenge frustrated over an inability to seize the race lead.

Though he’s sitting second overall, and is poised to reach the final podium with two stages remaining, the Tinkoff-Saxo rider is fresh off an overall win at the Tour of Poland, and is growing accustomed to his new status among the best racers in pro cycling.

Though he finished sixth at the Giro d’Italia, in May, and won two mountain stages and the KOM jersey at the Tour de France, in July, the effects of a long season, as well as the effects of high altitude, have taken a cumulative toll on the Polish rider.

The inclement high-mountain weather that has marred several stages of this race hasn’t helped, either.

Majka lost 20 seconds to overall leader Tejay van Garderen (BMC Racing) on the cold, wet, muddy stage into Crested Butte on stage 2, won by Robin Carpenter (Hincapie Sportswear).

On stage 3, Majka crossed the finish line with van Garderen, the stage winner, at Monarch Mountain, but was unable to come around the American for the stage win. Though he was quick to congratulate the BMC rider, Majka was clearly disappointed to have missed out on the victory.

In Breckenridge on Friday, Majka was again able to finish with van Garderen after a cold and wet mountain stage that featured two categorized climbs, including near-freezing temperatures and rain on Hoosier Pass with 23km remaining.

When van Garderen upped the pace on Boreas Pass, 5km from the finish, Majka was able to follow, finishing alongside the race leader, but he was unable to take time heading into Saturday’s 16km uphill time trial in Vail, where van Garderen, the stage winner last year, is the favorite.

Majka’s last uphill time trial came at the Giro d’Italia, where he placed seventh on the 26.8km stage, 3:28 behind Nairo Quintana (Movistar), at Bassano del Grappa. Majka also finished fourth at the Giro’s stage 12 time trial, a 41.9km TT from Barbaresco to Barolo.

Majka spoke with VeloNews following the stage about the challenges he’s faced this year, including fatigue, acclimatization, and adverse weather conditions.

“I don’t feel so good, because it was so, so cold,” Majka said. “It was like [40 degrees Fahrenheit] at the top. It was really difficult for me. My team was working on the front for me, helping me when I wasn’t feeling good, and when Tejay attacked, I was able to follow. I tried to take some time in the last few hundred meters, but he was on my wheel. I think I’ll finish this race second, or third. Tejay is so strong, and I’m a bit tired after the Tour, and after Poland.”

Majka heads into Saturday’s time trial 20 seconds behind van Garderen, 17 seconds ahead of Serghei Tvetcov (Jelly Belly), and 19 seconds ahead of Tom Danielson (Garmin-Sharp).

Majka said he has not seen the Vail TT course, and wasn’t overly concerned about its legendary difficulty; the course climbs 1,513 feet in 10 miles, finishing at 9,663 feet.

“When it’s a hard time trial, for me, it’s okay,” Majka said. “The first five or six kilometers are flat, and then it climbs to almost 3,000 meters. For me that’s okay, but I think it’s difficult to win this race. I don’t have the same condition as before Poland and after the Tour. I was stronger then, and it’s difficult to hold the condition. When I woke up this morning, I could feel my legs, they were tired.”

Majka arrived in Colorado four days before the Pro Challenge started, seemingly at a disadvantage to riders like van Garderen and Danielson, who had been training or racing at high altitude for weeks before the race began.

Asked if he feels it is possible to win the Pro Challenge without a longer period of acclimatization, Majka said he wasn’t sure.

“Maybe, if I come here next year, I’ll try coming two weeks before,” he said. “I was suffering for the first three days at this very high altitude. But two weeks before this race is the Tour of Poland… I don’t know.”

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Results: 2014 USA Pro Challenge, stage 5 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/race-results/results-2014-usa-pro-challenge-stage-5_342212 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/race-results/results-2014-usa-pro-challenge-stage-5_342212#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 23:35:03 +0000 VeloNews.com http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342212

Laurent Didier wins Stage 5 in Breckenridge, in front of Janier Acevedo. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

A cold, rainy ride from Woodland Park to Breckenridge is won by Trek Factory Racing's Laurent Didier

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Laurent Didier wins Stage 5 in Breckenridge, in front of Janier Acevedo. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

  • 1. Laurent Didier, Trek Factory Racing, in 3:50:38
  • 2. Janier Alexis Acevedo Colle, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 3. Rob Britton, Team SmartStop
  • 4. Benjamin King, Team Garmin-Sharp, at :00:15
  • 5. Jose Joao Pimenta Costa Mendes, Team Netapp-Endura, at :01:11
  • 6. Daniel Eaton, Bissell Development Team, at :01:26
  • 7. Serghei Tvetcov, Jelly Belly, at :01:33
  • 8. Richard Handley, Rapha Condor Jlt
  • 9. Tejay van Garderen, BMC Racing Team
  • 10. Rafal Majka, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 11. Cristiano Salerno, Cannondale
  • 12. Thomas Danielson, Team Garmin-Sharp, at :01:38
  • 13. Matthew Busche, Trek Factory Racing
  • 14. Chris Butler, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 15. Ruben Zepuntke, Bissell Development Team, at :01:52
  • 16. Joseph Rosskopf, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 17. Bartosz Huzarski, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 18. Lucas Euser, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling, at :02:06
  • 19. Michael Schär, BMC Racing Team
  • 20. Bruno Pires, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 21. Carter Jones, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 22. Julian Kyer, Team SmartStop
  • 23. Michael Rogers, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 24. Pawel Poljanski, Tinkoff-Saxo, at :02:23
  • 25. Ben Hermans, BMC Racing Team, at :02:49
  • 26. Alex Howes, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 27. Dion Smith, Hincapie Sportswear Development, at :03:05
  • 28. David de la Cruz Melgarejo, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 29. Frank Schleck, Trek Factory Racing
  • 30. Calvin Watson, Trek Factory Racing, at :03:24
  • 31. Phillip Gaimon, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 32. Riccardo Zoidl, Trek Factory Racing, at :03:34
  • 33. Clement Chevrier, Bissell Development Team
  • 34. Scott Zwizanski, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 35. Peter Stetina, BMC Racing Team, at :03:48
  • 36. Luis Enrique Davila, Jelly Belly, at :04:38
  • 37. Daniel Alexander Jaramillo Diez, Jamis-Hagens Berman, at :04:42
  • 38. Jai Crawford, Drapac Professional Cycling, at :04:44
  • 39. Edward Beltran Suarez, Tinkoff-Saxo, at :05:32
  • 40. Thomas Dekker, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 41. Hayden Roulston, Trek Factory Racing
  • 42. Patrick Konrad, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 43. Kirk Carlsen, Jelly Belly
  • 44. Gavin Mannion, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 45. Joonas Henttala, Team Novo Nordisk, at :06:21
  • 46. Zachary Bell, Team SmartStop
  • 47. Robbie Squire, Jamis-Hagens Berman, at :07:03
  • 48. Elliott Porter, Rapha Condor Jlt, at :08:23
  • 49. Matej Mohoric, Cannondale, at :08:50
  • 50. Tom Zirbel, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 51. Rick Zabel, BMC Racing Team
  • 52. Rasmus Guldhammer, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 53. Bjorn Selander, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 54. Jens Voigt, Trek Factory Racing
  • 55. Ryan Anderson, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 56. Christopher Jones, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 57. Tiago Machado, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 58. Gregor Muhlberger, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 59. Martin Kohler, BMC Racing Team
  • 60. Jesper Hansen, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 61. Scott Ambrose, Team Novo Nordisk
  • 62. Kiel Reijnen, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 63. Wesley Sulzberger, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 64. Tanner Putt, Bissell Development Team
  • 65. Markel Irizar Aranburu, Trek Factory Racing
  • 66. Ian Crane, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 67. Caleb Fairly, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 68. Jonathan Clarke, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 69. Toms Skujins, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 70. Darren Lapthorne, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 71. Matt Cooke, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 72. Javier Megias Leal, Team Novo Nordisk
  • 73. Joseph Lewis, Hincapie Sportswear Development, at :10:01
  • 74. Edward King, Cannondale, at :11:33
  • 75. Ben Jacques-Maynes, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 76. Daniel Summerhill, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 77. Aaron Perry, Team Novo Nordisk
  • 78. Charles Planet, Team Novo Nordisk
  • 79. Gregory Daniel, Bissell Development Team
  • 80. Brent Bookwalter, BMC Racing Team
  • 81. Kristian House, Rapha Condor Jlt
  • 82. Alan Marangoni, Cannondale
  • 83. Benjamin Day, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 84. Robin Carpenter, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 85. Jure Kocjan, Team SmartStop
  • 86. Steve Fisher, Jelly Belly
  • 87. Stephen Leece, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 88. Mike Friedman, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 89. Alexander Candelario, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 90. Jeffry Louder, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 91. Johnathan Freter, Jelly Belly
  • 92. Ivan Basso, Cannondale
  • 93. Elia Viviani, Cannondale
  • 94. Yannick Eijssen, BMC Racing Team
  • 95. Michel Koch, Cannondale
  • 96. Tyler Magner, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 97. Oscar Clark, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 98. Nathan Van Hooydonck, Bissell Development Team
  • 99. Leopold König, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 100. Jonathan Cantwell, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 101. Ian Burnett, Jelly Belly
  • 102. Carson Miller, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 103. Adam Phelan, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 104. James Oram, Bissell Development Team
  • 105. Jacob Rathe, Jelly Belly
  • 106. Michael Schwarzmann, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 107. Cameron Wurf, Cannondale
  • 108. Luis Romero Amaran, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 109. Hugh Carthy, Rapha Condor Jlt
  • 110. Bernard Sulzberger, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 111. Tom Moses, Rapha Condor Jlt
  • 112. Keegan Swirbul, Bissell Development Team
  • 113. Lachlan Norris, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 114. Jesse Anthony, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies, at :17:06
  • 115. Jordan Kerby, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 116. Michael Torckler, Team SmartStop, at :17:29
  • 117. Martijn Verschoor, Team Novo Nordisk
  • 118. Michael Cuming, Rapha Condor Jlt
  • DNF David Lozano Riba, Team Novo Nordisk
  • DNF Eric Marcotte, Team SmartStop
  • DNF Travis McCabe, Team SmartStop
  • DNS Michael Mørkøv, Tinkoff-Saxo

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Laurent Didier’s tenacious climbing wins a wet stage 5 at USA Pro Challenge http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/laurent-didiers-tenacious-climbing-wins-wet-stage-5-usa-pro-challenge_342189 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/laurent-didiers-tenacious-climbing-wins-wet-stage-5-usa-pro-challenge_342189#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 22:10:11 +0000 Spencer Powlison http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342189

Laurent Didier wins Stage 5 in Breckenridge, in front of Janier Acevedo. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Trek Factory Racing's Didier delivers the coup de grace on Boreas Pass, narrowly winning stage 5 in chilly Breckenridge

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Laurent Didier wins Stage 5 in Breckenridge, in front of Janier Acevedo. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Laurent Didier (Trek Factory Racing) won USA Pro Challenge stage 5 in Breckenridge with a decisive attack on the final climb.

Picking up where his teammate Jens Voigt left off on Thursday, Didier rode an aggressive race, attacking early, alone, on the day’s category two climb up Hoosier Pass.

His first attempt was not to be, as three of his early breakaway companions chased him down on the long, wet, cold descent into Breckenridge.

However, the Trek Factory rider had one more chance, and he took it on Boreas Pass, attacking Janier Acevedo (Garmin-Sharp), Ben King (Garmin-Sharp), and Rob Britton (Team SmartStop). The three others could not respond to his effort on the steep pitch above Breckenridge.

Britton and Acevedo chased valiantly on the descent. On the final drag through town, it looked for a moment that Didier would suffer the same indignity that Voigt did — to be caught in the final kilometer — but not this time.

The Luxembourger put his head down, grasped the drops and powered to the win, mere seconds ahead of the two chasers.

“I saw the 500 meters [sign] when we passed the line [the first time through Breckenridge],” said Didier. “I knew it would be fast. The last kilometer was tough, lots [of] corners. The downhill, you didn’t need to brake, with wide corners; [it was] just go, go, go. It was a little wet though, so I didn’t take so much risk.

“I am super happy because I don’t win many races, but the ones I do win are in tough conditions. It’s a little strange but it’s like that. … So in the middle part of the race, when there was a lot of rain, I stayed focused, put on my rain jacket and gloves, so I was prepared for the finale.”

Behind the leaders, the GC group also saw some fireworks on the final climb.

Tejay van Garderen (BMC) attacked on Boreas Pass, and Rafal Majka (Tinkoff-Saxo) followed. Both solidified their first and second GC placings, respectively.

“There was a battle at the end for GC time,” said van Garderen. “I was glad to take a few more seconds on Danielson. But Majka is still pretty close and making me a bit nervous for the time trial tomorrow.”

Ben Hermans (BMC) was knocked out of his podium position. Serghei Tvetcov (Jelly Belly) now sits third, 37 seconds back. Tom Danielson (Garmin-Sharp) remains fourth, while Matthew Busche (Trek Factory Racing) moved up to fifth overall.

“He was struggling from the cold,” van Garderen said of Hermans. “He got distanced on Hoosier Pass. … Maybe we could have gone one-two in the race. Hermans was riding strong, but if you have a bad day, then that can be the end of it. I know that better than anyone.”

Early escape

A breakaway of 12 riders got away from the field early in the day.

Notably, the group included Acevedo, who won stage 4 of the USA Pro Challenge in Beaver Creek last year.

The peloton showed little initiative, allowing the gap to stretch to over four minutes, as the riders faced a cool, rainy day in the Colorado high country.

“It was absolutely miserable out there,” said King. “Hard to know how your body will react in those conditions; with hail, rain. I don’t know [what the] temperatures were, but it was hard. It was a war of attrition.”

Jelly Belly’s Luis Lemus won the only intermediate points sprint of the day in Fairplay. Jai Crawford (Drapac) was second, and Richard Handley (Rapha Condor-JLT) was third.

Out of the front group, three leaders forged ahead on Hoosier Pass: King, Didier, and Britton.

As they reached the top of the course, Didier got a small gap and won the king of the mountains sprint.

Acevedo followed close behind the two chasers and caught them shortly into the descent.

Back in the main field, Hoosier Pass took its toll, splitting a small group of 11 riders off the front. Race leader Tejay van Garderen (BMC) safely made the front group, and they were 2:45 behind the leaders at the crest of the climb.

Didier’s advantage over the chasing trio was a mere 10 seconds with nine miles to go, as the descent leveled out on the approach to Breckenridge.

With 8.5 miles remaining, the leader was caught.

Entering Breckenridge, the four frontrunners had 45 seconds over the eight chasers remaining from the early breakaway.

Final test on Boreas Pass

After 100 miles of racing, the leaders faced the day’s final test, a steep, short climb up Boreas Pass.

King attacked on the run-in to the last climb, forcing Didier to chase with Acevedo on his wheel.

As the road pitched up, King had a small gap of 10 seconds.

However, his move didn’t stick, and Didier countered, quickly gapping his three companions.

“I tried to keep pace high for Janier [Acevedo],” said King. “Laurent attacked at the top. … At about 300 meters from the top of the last KOM is where I got caught. He came over the top of me with a huge acceleration. I couldn’t hold his wheel.”

The Trek Factory rider crested the climb alone, but not out of sight.

After the blazing fast final descent to the finish, Didier had a six-second advantage over Britton and Acevedo with one kilometer to go.

Britton chased hard on the final straight in Breckenridge, but it wasn’t enough to catch Didier, the Luxembourg national time trial champion, who held them off by a few bike lengths. Acevedo finished second; Britton was third.

“It’s really nice to win,” said Didier. “Before when I was a Continental rider, I won some races, but always in the rain. You need to be focused in the head and believe. Some riders suffer a lot with the cold. During the year, I don’t have many possibilities to ride for myself. I think last year, I did several breakaways, but never [got] a win in the end.”

“[I'm] happy for Didier,” said King. “He’s a deserving winner, but it was disappointing to come so close and not win.”

The drama on Boreas Pass wasn’t exclusive to the leaders. On the final climb, van Garderen attacked the group of GC favorites that had survived the wet, cold ride over Hoosier Pass.

Serghei Tvetcov (Jelly Belly), and Rafal Majka (Tinkoff-Saxo) were able to respond, and rode to the finish with the race leader.

Tom Danielson (Garmin-Sharp) missed the split, but held on to finish only five seconds behind the van Garderen group.

Saturday will see the USA Pro Challenge tackle the storied Vail Pass hill climb time trial, a 10 mile test that finishes at 9,600 feet above sea level.

“It’s a tough TT,” van Garderen said. “Everything [comes] down to equipment choice, to pacing, to how to warm up at that kind of altitude this late in the race. It’s completely different. Last year, even though I won, I got my pacing wrong because I really started to die there in the last kilometer and a half. I’m still trying to figure that one out. Hopefully I get it right this time. The first part flat, the second part is uphill. It’s a mix between normal TT and uphill TT. It’s a tricky one to get right.

“There’s a little bit of nerves for the TT, but I’m confident. All the guys around me on GC, I’ve beaten in time trials before, and I have a pretty comfortable margin. Even if I lose the stage, I just have to manage the gap. I’m nervous, but confident.”

The post Laurent Didier’s tenacious climbing wins a wet stage 5 at USA Pro Challenge appeared first on VeloNews.com.

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Vuelta a Espana start list http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/preliminary-vuelta-espana-start-list_341121 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/preliminary-vuelta-espana-start-list_341121#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 18:00:28 +0000 VeloNews.com http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=341121

Twenty-two teams will line up at the start of the Vuelta, August 23 in Jerez de la Frontera

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Ag2r-La Mondiale
Carlos BETANCUR
Maxime BOUET
Hubert DUPONT
Damien GAUDIN
Patrick GRETSCH
Yauheni HUTAROVICH
Lloyd MONDORY
Rinaldo NOCENTINI
Sebastien TURGOT

Astana
Fabio ARU
Mikel LANDA MEANA
Tanel KANGERT
Daniil FOMINYKH
Alexey LUTSENKO
Paolo TIRALONGO
Andery ZEITS
Andrea GUARDINI
Jacopo GUARNIERI

Belkin
Stef CLEMENT
Laurens TEN DAM
Robert GESINK
Moreno HOFLAND
Wilco KELDERMAN
Paul MARTENS
Maarten TJALLINGII
Robert WAGNER
Martijn KEIZER

BMC Racing
Samuel SANCHEZ
Cadel EVANS
Philippe GILBERT
Steve MORABITO
Dominik NERZ
Manuel QUINZIATO
Rohan DENNIS
Lawrence WARBASSE
Danilo WYSS

Caja Rural-Seguros RGA
David ARROYO
Antonio PIEDRA
Amets TXURRUKA
Pello BILBAO
Francesco LASCA
Javier ARAMENDIA
Karol DOMAGALSKI
Luis MAS GUILLERMO
Luis Leon SANCHEZ

Cannondale
George BENNETT
Maciej BODNAR
Guillaume BOIVIN
Paolo LONGO BORGHINI
Damiano CARUSO
Alessandro DE MARCHI
Oscar GATTO
Matthias KRIZEK
Peter SAGAN

Cofidis
Yoann BAGOT
Jerome COPPEL
Romain HARDY
Gert JOEAAR
Christophe LE MEVEL
Guillaume LEVARLET
Luis Angel MATE MAROONES
Daniel NAVARRO GARCIA
Romain ZINGLE

Europcar

Dan Craven
Jimmy Engoulvent
Romain Sicard
Yannick Martinez
Natnael Berhane
Jérôme Cousin
Maxime Mederel
Bryan Nauleau
Vincent Jérôme

FDJ.fr
Nacer BOUHANNI
Kenny ELISSONDE
Murilo FISCHER
Laurent MANGEL
Thibaut PINOT
Anthony ROUX
Geoffrey SOUPE
Johan LE BON
Cedric PINEAU

Garmin-Sharp
Nathan BROWN
Andre CARDOSO
Koldo FERNANDEZ DE LAREA
Nathan HAAS
Ryder HESJEDAL
Dan MARTIN
David MILLAR
Andrew TALANSKY
Johan VANSUMMEREN

Giant-Shimano
Nikias ARNDT
Warren BARGUIL
Lawson CRADDOCK
John DEGENKOLB
Johannes FROHLINGER
Chad HAGA
Koen DE KORT
Tobias LUDVIGSSON
Ramon SINKELDAM

IAM Cycling
Marcel AREGGER
Jonathan FUMEAUX
Sebastien HINAULT
Pirmin LANG
Matteo PELUCCHI
Vicente REYNES
Johann TSCHOPP
Aleksejs SARAMOTINS
Patrick SCHELLING

Katusha
Giampaolo CARUSO
Sergei CHERNETSKIY
Alexander KOLOBNEV
Dmitriy KOZONCHUK
Alberto LOSADA
Daniel MORENO
Joaquin RODRIGUEZ
Iurii TROFIMOV
Eduard VORGANOV

Lampre-Merida
Winner ANACONA GOMEZ
Damiano CUNEGO
Elia FAVILLI
Roberto FERRARI
Christopher HORNER
Przemyslaw NIEMIEC
Filippo POZZATO
Maximiliano RICHEZE
Josè Rodolfo SERPA PEREZ

Lotto-Belisol
Sander ARMEE
Jens DEBUSSCHERE
Adam HANSEN
Greg HENDERSON
Pim LIGTHART
Maxime MONFORT
Jurgen VAN DEN BROECK
Vegard BREEN
Bart DE CLERCQ

Movistar
Andrey AMADOR
Jonathan CASTROVIEJO
Imanol ERVITI
Jose HERRADA
Gorka IZAGUIRRE
Adriano MALORI
Nairo QUINTANA
Alejandro VALVERDE
Javier MORENO

MTN-Qhubeka
Gerald CIOLEK
Jacques Janse VAN RENSBURG
Merhawi KUDUS
Louis MEINTJES
Sergio PARDILLA
Kristian SBARAGLI
Daniel TEKLEHAIMANOT
Jay THOMSON
Jaco VENTER

Omega Pharma-Quick Step
Tom BOONEN
Gianluca BRAMBILLA
Tony MARTIN
Wout POELS
Rigoberto URAN URAN
Martin VELITS
Nikolas MAES
Pieter SERRY
Carlos Verona

Orica-GreenEdge
Samuel BEWLEY
Esteban CHAVES
Simon CLARKE
Mitch DOCKER
Brett LANCASTER
Michael MATTHEWS
Cameron MEYER
Ivan SANTAROMITA
Adam YATES

Sky
Dario CATALDO
Philip DEIGAN
Christopher FROOME
Pete KENNAUGH
Vasil KIRYIENKA
Christian KNEES
Mikel NIEVE
Luke ROWE
Kanstantsin SIUTSOU

Tinkoff-Saxo
Alberto CONTADOR
Chris Anker SORENSEN
Daniele BENATI
Jesus HERNANDEZ
Matteo TOSATTO
Michael VALGREN
Olivier ZAUGG
Sergio PAULINHO
Ivan ROVNY

Trek Factory Racing
Julian ARREDONDO
Fabian CANCELLARA
Bob JUNGELS
Yaroslav POPOVYCH
Jesse SERGENT
Jasper STUYVEN
Kristof VANDEWALLE
Haimar ZUBELDIA
Fabio FELLINE

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Horner finds solace on bike after controversial Vuelta exit http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/horner-finds-solace-bike-controversial-vuelta-exit_342172 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/horner-finds-solace-bike-controversial-vuelta-exit_342172#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:50:29 +0000 Andrew Hood http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342172

Defending Vuelta a España champion Chris Horner will not start the 2014 race Saturday. His team has scratched him from the roster to comply with MPCC code. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com (File).

Under UCI rules, Horner is in the clear to race, but Lampre-Merida follows the stricter protocol adopted by the MPCC

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Defending Vuelta a España champion Chris Horner will not start the 2014 race Saturday. His team has scratched him from the roster to comply with MPCC code. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com (File).

MONTECASTILLO, Spain (VN) — Journalists searched out shade from the bleaching Spanish summer sun, waiting for Chris Horner to return from a training ride. They wanted a first-person reaction to the stunning news Friday that the defending Vuelta a España champion would not be starting due to low cortisol levels.

His Lampre-Merida teammates completed a two-hour training spin, showered, had lunch, and were deep into siesta; still no Horner. One sport director went to the local airport to pick up team manager Brett Copeland. Journalists checked their watches. A team PR man came out to say Horner still had 90 kilometers to ride. Another sport director left in a team car, came back, and when asked where Horner was, he shrugged his shoulders; he had gone for a haircut. At 5 p.m., just as a handful of exasperated reporters were packing up to head back to Jerez de la Frontera for the team presentation, Horner finally rolled up.

With the enormity of the news of his Vuelta scratch, Horner searched for solace in the only place he knows, the bike.

“I found out this morning, so I went out and rode my bike for six hours,” Horner said. “It’s the best thing to do. It clears the head. It’s where I feel most comfortable, either riding my bike or hanging out with my wife. For me, the best thing to do was to ride six hours. It’s a great day. The countryside is fantastic. … If you had spoken to me this morning, it would have been a bit ugly. When you’re out training six hours, you realize life is not that bad.”

Horner, 41, was trying to come to grips with what had just happened to him. He woke up Friday morning to discover that pre-Vuelta health controls taken Thursday revealed low levels of cortisol, triggered by his use of oral cortisone to treat a nagging chest infection dating back to the Tour de France. He had done nothing illegal, he had followed the rules, and it was certainly not a doping infraction, but he was out of the Vuelta.

Under UCI rules, Horner was in the clear to race. In fact, he had meticulously followed the protocol, receiving official approval for doctors to prescribe the cortisone with a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE). Lampre-Merida, however, follows the stricter protocol adopted by the cycling team’s organization MPCC (Movement Pour un Cyclisme Credible), an advocacy group among teams to promote a cleaner image for the scandal-tarnished peloton.

When Horner sat down with team doctors and staffers on Friday morning, they only had one choice. According to MPCC rules, Horner couldn’t start. They pulled Horner out of the Vuelta on the eve of his title defense.

It took a six-hour bike ride alone across the barren Andalusian landscape for Horner to try to get his head around what had just unfolded.

“We understand the rules; we respect the rules. This is unfortunate for me. The Vuelta was a big objective for me. I worked and trained to be here. I suffered through the Tour and Utah. I suffered with breathing at the Tour and Utah, so the only option left was with the medication,” Horner said, explaining how two rounds of antibiotics was unable to break his chest infection.

“After the Tour, with my doctor in Oregon, with agreement of the team doctors, we decided that oral cortisone was the only treatment left to clear up the sickness in my lungs,” he continued. “I didn’t want to come here with the same sickness I had at the Tour, and we took every legal medication we could … the problem was with the cortisol level going too low.”

Horner’s case raised several questions at the eve of the Vuelta. First, a glaring inconsistency between the existing UCI and World Anti-Doping Agency rules, and the even stricter guidelines adopted by the MPCC.

The second issue is how several teams have not joined MPCC, creating a gap inside the peloton. Major teams, including Sky, BMC Racing, Movistar, Omega Pharma-Quick Step, Tinkoff-Saxo, and Trek Factory Racing, are not part of the group. Had Horner been racing for one of the teams not part of the MPCC, he would be starting the Vuelta tomorrow.

Horner also openly admitted he knew he was taking a risk in falling below accepted limits with the cortisone treatment, but insisted that getting well was the priority, instead of starting the Vuelta sick yet again.

“Every ‘I’ and ‘T’ was crossed, with the UCI, with the team, every substance I took was legal, every substance I took was approved … I did know, and I was completely aware, that there could be a problem,” he said.

“It’s frustrating as a rider. I knew the risk with the medication, but it was the only way to be healthy,” he said. “Those are the rules. I don’t disagree with the rules. I knew the risk taking the oral cortisone. I had my fingers crossed, and that I wouldn’t have any problems, but with the health checks, it wasn’t possible.”

Horner said he would leave the Vuelta, spending a few days at his home in Denia along Spain’s Mediterranean coast, waiting for his wife’s arrival to Spain, before returning to the United States.

There is nothing stopping Horner from returning to competition once his cortisol levels return to normal, which could be a matter of days, and he hopes to race the Canadian World Tour races.

“This is one more blow on the chin. I am really disappointed [not] to be racing here against guys like Froome and Contador. I was really looking forward to that,” Horner said shaking his head.

“It’s been a long, trying season. The Tour was incredibly hard,” he continued. “I was hoping to be here at a 100 percent, but clearly I am not. There is nothing more I can do. I did everything right, with training, diet, commitment, but it’s just not meant to be. I have to move on.”

It might take a few more six-hour training rides to get over the latest setback.

Valerio Conti, a neo-pro taking Horner’s spot on Lampre’s roster, will ride with the No. 1 bib in his grand tour debut.

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Andrew Talansky plays helper role in deep Garmin lineup for Vuelta http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/andrew-talansky-plays-helper-role-deep-garmin-lineup-vuelta_342160 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/andrew-talansky-plays-helper-role-deep-garmin-lineup-vuelta_342160#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:33:58 +0000 Andrew Hood http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342160

Andrew Talansky (Garmin-Sharp) returns to racing on Saturday at the Vuelta a España. It will be his first race after abandoning the Tour de France in July. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com (File).

Talansky returns to competition Saturday with realistic expectations in his first race back since his bitter exit from the Tour

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Andrew Talansky (Garmin-Sharp) returns to racing on Saturday at the Vuelta a España. It will be his first race after abandoning the Tour de France in July. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com (File).

JEREZ DE LA FRONTERA, Spain (VN) — Andrew Talansky starts the Vuelta a España on Saturday with one eye on helping his Garmin-Sharp teammates and another on the 2015 Tour de France.

Talansky returns to competition in Saturday’s team time trial with realistic expectations in his first race back since his bitter exit from the Tour in July.

Healthy again and fully recovered from his Tour crashes, Talansky realizes that the best road back to the Tour goes straight through the Vuelta.

“The easiest thing would have been to race at Colorado, but in order to set yourself up for the next season, you need a grand tour in your legs, and I only did half the Tour, so that was going to be a detriment to 2015,” Talansky told VeloNews. “This will help me moving toward returning to the Tour next year. This is the first stepping-stone toward that.”

Talansky’s season was short-circuited when he crashed hard twice during the Tour’s first week. A brave battle on the stage to Oyonnax kept him in the race, but he was forced to exit without having the chance to test his legs that delivered a dramatic victory at the Critérium du Dauphiné.

Six weeks later, he returns to the Vuelta with realistic expectations, openly admitting he doesn’t have the form he did in June and July.

“If I can come away with a stage win, that would be exciting,” he said of his Vuelta plan. “You have to be realistic. It took me months and months to get to the level that I was at [in] the Dauphiné and Tour. And I haven’t had that time to prepare for this Vuelta.”

Talansky joins Ryder Hesjedal and Daniel Martin in a deep Garmin-Sharp squad. Both Hesjedal and Martin skipped the Tour de France, so they come motivated to do well. Talansky said he’s ready to slot into a helper’s role behind his teammates.

“We have a great team here. For Dan and Ryder, from the Giro onwards, their sights have transitioned to the Vuelta. I am happy to be here to support those guys,” Talansky said. “We have two great leaders for the Vuelta, and I am excited to help them.”

Talansky tipped his hat to Hesjedal, who gave him decisive support during the final-stage raid to secure the Dauphiné victory.

Garmin will bring a loaded team, with real options for the final podium. Hesjedal missed the Tour for the first time since 2007 — he went home after the Giro and regrouped in Maui, returning to competition with the Tour of Poland.

“Everyone has the legs, it’s a matter of how it unfolds. Are we capable of multiple guys up there in the race? I think so,” Hesjedal said. “I think we’ll be better off for it. All three of us are capable of being up there.”

Martin also returns to the Vuelta after crashing out in the opening team time trial at the Giro.

Hesjedal thinks Garmin can stack up against the high-quality Vuelta field.

“It’s a super-deep field here, but that’s what you want. You want the best riders at any race,” Hesjedal said. “Every grand tour is hard. The Vuelta should be a great race.”

With Hesjedal and Martin backed by riders such as Talansky, they could go far indeed.

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Video: How to improve your position on the bike http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/road/video-improve-position-bike_342151 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/road/video-improve-position-bike_342151#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 15:10:08 +0000 VeloNews.com http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342151

Global Cycling Network provides basic advice for beginner riders to improve their positioning on the bike.

Global Cycling Network provides some basic pointers for new riders who aren't sure how to position themselves on the bike

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Global Cycling Network provides basic advice for beginner riders to improve their positioning on the bike.

Editor’s Note: This video is courtesy of Global Cycling Network. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily represent the opinions of VeloNews.com, Velo magazine or the editors and staff of Competitor Group, Inc.

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Week in Tech: $450 floor pump, a safer helmet, and SRAM’s new wheels http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/bikes-and-tech/week-tech-450-floor-pump-safer-helmet-srams-new-wheels_342085 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/bikes-and-tech/week-tech-450-floor-pump-safer-helmet-srams-new-wheels_342085#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 14:28:47 +0000 VeloNews.com http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342085

It might be the most expertly crafted floor pump on the planet. It will set you back $450, though. Photo: Silca

Silca introduces $450 pump, Poc adds MIPS to Octal helmet, SRM announces new head unit, and SRAM releases new carbon wheels

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It might be the most expertly crafted floor pump on the planet. It will set you back $450, though. Photo: Silca

Here’s your Week in Tech — all the gear news, tips, and announcements you need and none of the marketing gibberish you don’t.

SRM previews Power Control 8

SRM was the first name in the power meter game and is still the largest. Especially in the WorldTour peloton, most riders use an SRM crankset and a Power Control head unit. The Power Control 7 has been a mainstay for years, but riders have complained about its lack of GPS features.

The new Power Control 8 fulfills riders’ requests for GPS data and more. With an expected ship date in December, the PC 8 will have ANT+, Bluetooth, and WiFi compatibility, bringing wireless downloads to SRM users. SRM expects the PC 8 to retail for about $850-$870. That’s $100 more than the PC 7, and over $200 more expensive than the Garmin Edge 1000.

The head unit screen and general functions are expected to be similar to the PC 7. SRM has designed it to be a precise training tool, without as many of the GPS and route features as a Garmin. SRM is unapologetic about price and features, owner and founder Uli Schoberer told VeloNews earlier this year, “We make professional training tools, and we use some of the finest engineering and manufacturing. This costs money.”

Expect to see a production version of the PC 8 at the Interbike tradeshow next month.

Silca SuperPista Ultimate floor pump

A $450 floor pump. A $450 floor pump?!

In the past year, Silca was taken over by American Josh Poertner, formerly of Zipp, who has breathed new life into the brand. Silca’s latest product is a premier floor pump, which, like everything made by Silca, is expected to last a very long time.

With a price tag of $450, one would expect the SuperPista to inflate your tires on its own and maybe make you a sandwich afterward. But it does neither. What the SuperPista is, though, is a finely crafted tool, made in the USA, that is intended to last long enough to be handed down to your kids.

The handle is made of rosewood, and Silca says that it studied the shapes of a high-end culinary knife company to develop the shape of the handle area. The hose is rated up to 12,000 PSI, while the pump’s gauge goes up to 160 PSI. The base is large and sturdy, and a piece floating above the base, which Silca refers to as the “Surfboard,” holds the gauge and a magnetic garage for the chuck.

Read More > >

Garmin-Sharp will be first team wearing MIPS in a grand tour

Poc’s products are bold in design, even strange-looking to the unaccustomed eye, but the company has been one of the first to implement a number of technological trends in the helmet world. Poc was the first brand to develop a cycling helmet with the MIPS helmet liner, an inner sheath that helps prevent rotation concussion injuries. Now, Poc will be the first manufacturer to provide its sponsored pro road team with MIPS-equipped helmets.

The Octal road helmet, worn by Garmin-Sharp, will now be available in a MIPS version. The new MIPS helmet gets a tweaked look with white accents inside the vents, rather than black, which adds visibility to the already bright helmet. The MIPS-equipped version is also heavier. We hope to test the Octal MIPS in the coming weeks to see how the MIPS liner affects comfort and breathability.

Poc Eyepark

With its new Octal MIPS, Poc has also unveiled a technology called Eyepark. Magnets are placed in the brow of the Octal and the top of the Poc Do Blade sunglasses so that a rider can push the sunglasses up, opening a range of sight below the lenses. This would be advantageous on descents, especially if salt buildup on the glasses compromises the rider’s vision.

“The idea was born at a training camp in Mallorca,” Garmin-Sharp’s Nathas Haas said. “I shared a thought I had about using magnets on the helmet and eyewear, to avoid having to take your glasses on and off and put them in pockets or the team car. POC listened, and here we are.”

The Eyepark technology will be made available for current Poc Octal helmets and Do Blade sunglasses.

Octal MIPS and Poc products equipped with Eyepark are expected to be available in Spring 2015.

Read More > >

SRAM launches carbon Rise 60 mountain bike wheels

In the world of mountain biking, it seems every new wheelset is carbon. Even for daily adventures, carbon wheels are getting more use than ever. Carbon wheels are increasingly stronger and less expensive.

They’re still not cheap, of course. But SRAM is launching a more budget-friendly carbon cross-country wheelset, the Rise 60, to complement its high-zoot Rise XX tubulars. The Rise 60 wheels will be available in 27.5” and 29” models. The rim uses a hookless-bead design, like many carbon mountain wheels, which sheds some weight and drastically improves durability.

For RockShox RS-1 riders, the front wheel can be ordered with a Predictive Steering hub, which adds $40 to the price of the wheel.

Wheelsets are now available starting at $1,990 with weights at 1,390g for the 27.5” set and 1,440g for the 29” set.

Read More > >

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Bissell sport director dishes on working with devo riders http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/bissell-sport-director-dishes-on-working-with-devo-riders_342060 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/bissell-sport-director-dishes-on-working-with-devo-riders_342060#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 13:52:43 +0000 Matthew Beaudin http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342060

Bissell sport director Omer Kem, seen here during the Tour of Utah, said "positive reinforcement is really important" when working with younger riders. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Omer Kem says leading the young Bissell Development Team this season has been “rewarding”

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Bissell sport director Omer Kem, seen here during the Tour of Utah, said "positive reinforcement is really important" when working with younger riders. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colorado (VN) — The other team cars have left. The voice coming from the megaphone is counting down the moments to start. But Bissell sport director Omer Kem sits in the driver’s seat, door open, relaxed.

This isn’t his first rodeo. And that’s what the Bissell Development Team is banking on. Coupled with Axel Merckx, who came over from the Bontrager squad in the switch from Bissell as a stalwart, standard domestic team to one focused on young rider development, the outfit has two savvy directors and riders with plenty of potential. Kem took a few minutes to talk with VeloNews Thursday morning in Colorado Springs.

VeloNews: What’s it like to be the first stop now instead maybe one of the last for riders?

Omer Kem: This year’s been a lot of fun. It’s been a change because you’re working with younger riders, and they don’t need motivation because they’re so hungry and driven and competitive. And that just comes from their whole career being in front of them. So it’s been rewarding, and fun for me in that regard. The biggest change for me has probably been just in how I deal with positive and negative things. And the guys do well, that positive reinforcement is really important. You need to make sure that they feel encouraged. Like they made the most of the opportunity that they had. And if they struggle or have a bad day you really need to give them a pat on the back and make sure they know there’s going to be another opportunity. And that they are young and they are learning and it’s a mistake that they don’t want to make again. But at the same time, it’s OK. As long as they try to do the best they can, then that’s really what Axel and I are looking for.

VN: What just makes you slap your head when you see these kids do it?
OK: If somebody makes the same mistake over and over again no matter how many times we’ve talked about it. To be honest with you, this is a great group of guys. They’ve all been racing for a long time, but you have that 18-year-old and all the sudden you’re at a pretty big race, maybe the biggest race he’s ever done, and you know, coming back for bottles and he’s never really come back for bottles before. And you’re like, “It could be so much easier than it is.” And you have to wait and say, “OK. I can’t get mad at him about this. I have to make sure this is a learning opportunity.” Because negative reinforcement is not going to make him learn or be better the next time.

VN: What are they great at that surprises you?
OK: Well the best thing they have going for them is that they have no idea what they’re good at. And so there’s nothing in their minds saying, “I can’t do that. Or I can’t be in the breakaway and sprint at the end. Or I can’t climb with best guys.” I’ve got this classics rider. He’s 21 years old, from Germany [Ruben Zepuntke]. Was like top 20 going up to Monarch. He didn’t get dropped ’till the very end. He’s a 160-pound German classic kid. He has no idea, and he’s not afraid of anybody or of anything. When you’re dealing with older guys who have maybe 10 years of experience instead of two or three years of experience, they get it in their head what they can and can’t do.

VN: Are the older guys good to the kids? Do they get pushed around a bit?
OK: The ProTour riders have a lot of respect for them. For what they’ve done, and where they’re going. They know that these guys coming from this program, they can be the future of cycling. From a domestic standpoint these guys spend a lot of time racing in Europe. They do the biggest races in the United States. They don’t spend a lot of time in that domestic peloton. So maybe they don’t have the relationships with some of the other smaller teams. And I don’t think that that’s a bad thing. If I can do anything for them, if Axel can be the voice that the ProTour teams hear when talking about these riders, if we have someone who maybe isn’t quite ready, I can talk to any domestic team director. I’ve known these guys forever. And they trust where I’m coming from because I have nothing to gain. I’m not making any money off of it. I’m not trying to steal their riders because I only work with 19- to 22-year-olds.

VN: You can only do so much, though, right? They still have to take their lumps?
OK: Absolutely. Nope. Cycling is hard. It never gets any easier. Maybe you go faster. Maybe there’s more results. But it never really gets easy.

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Gallery: 2014 USA Pro Challenge, stage 4 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/gallery/gallery-2014-usa-pro-challenge-stage-4_342104 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/gallery/gallery-2014-usa-pro-challenge-stage-4_342104#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 13:18:54 +0000 Casey B. Gibson http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342104

Jens Voigt tries for a stage win in what may be the last major breakaway exploit of his career

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Lampre forced into ‘difficult’ spot over Horner’s test http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/lampre-forced-into-difficult-spot-over-horners-test_342087 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/lampre-forced-into-difficult-spot-over-horners-test_342087#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 12:47:14 +0000 Gregor Brown http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342087

Chris Horner will not ride in Saturday's stage 1 team time trial at the Vuelta after he was removed from the team's roster at the last minute. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

The 42-year-old was taken off Lampre's Vuelta a Espana team Friday morning after bronchitis medication lowered his cortisol levels

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Chris Horner will not ride in Saturday's stage 1 team time trial at the Vuelta after he was removed from the team's roster at the last minute. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

Lampre-Merida found itself in a “difficult” situation Friday morning when it heard about Chris Horner’s cortisol levels on the eve of his Vuelta a Espana title defense. The team had to pull him off its roster for the grand tour because it follows stricter anti-doping rules set up by the Movement for a Credible Cycling (MPCC), even if cycling’s rules allowed him to race.

“Does it make sense or not?” Lampre team manager Brent Copeland said to VeloNews. “We have to respect with what we signed up for. When we signed up with MPCC, we agreed with what they are doing, so agreeing with that is respecting what they put down. Whether it’s right or wrong, that’s difficult to call.”

The 42-year-old from Oregon has been sick since the Tour de France. Though he was riding well in the Larry H. Miller Tour of Utah earlier in August, Horner was coughing often and could not shake his bronchitis.

After the Tour of Utah ended, the team and Horner took the various steps to acquire a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) from the UCI that allowed Horner to start cortisone therapy. The team doctor said Friday morning, however, that the therapy and possibly jet lag lowered his cortisol hormone values.

Lampre knew it was a risk that Horner could not start the Vuelta but wanted to see him get over his bronchitis. When the blood test returned low values, Lampre had to respect the MPCC’s rules — even if the UCI would have allowed him to race. The TUE he had acquired would have allowed him to continue using cortisone until Monday.

“The bad publicity of pulling him out at the last minute? We’re not worried about it,” Copeland said. “It depends on how someone looks at it. The way I look at it is that the team shows once again that we respect the organization that we signed up with.”

The voluntary organization began in 2007 in the wake of the Operación Puerto doping scandal, but gathered speed after the Lance Armstrong case in 2012. It strengthens cycling’s anti-doping rules with its own additional layer of protection. Its cortisol level test is in place to stop riders abusing TUEs to take cortisone, but in Horner’s case, he was trying to shake a bad cold.

“It’s a difficult one to call, but as a team we signed up with the MPCC,” added Copeland. “We will follow the rules and we can’t do much about it.”

The MPCC has members from the first, second and third division. However, of the 18 UCI WorldTour first division teams, only 11 are members. Seven teams — Tinkoff-Saxo, BMC Racing, Sky, Trek Factory Racing, Movistar, Cannondale, and Omega Pharma-Quick Step — have not joined.

“Each one runs the team how they want to, I can’t judge it,” Copeland added. “We sat down with our medical staff when the MPCC started, and everyone agreed with what they are trying to do. When this happens, you can’t go against it even if you feel you are in the right and your rider should take part.”

Besides cortisol testing, the MPCC’s other rules include:

— Prohibit a rider from racing after the positive result of the first analysis or A sample.
— Don’t sign a rider who has had a ban of more than six months during the two years following his ban. An exception is given to whereabouts cases.
— If a rider needs corticosteroids, then pull him from competition for eight days.
— An internal control following a positive test within the team.
— If a team has more than one positive case from the past 12 months, withdraw it and assess the situation.

Copeland said Horner is “frustrated more than upset.” The cyclist was hit by a car while training in April, suffered a punctured lung and broken ribs, and had to skip the Giro d’Italia. Bronchitis, and using cortisone, has now sidelined him ahead of the Vuelta a España, which begins with Saturday’s 12.6-kilometer team time trial in Jerez de la Frontera.

“Of course I’m sad about this news,” Horner said in a team press release. “I was willing to try to defend the 2013 title. [The] Vuelta was my main target in the season, the team signed me with the aim of being competitive in the Spanish race, but I accept the decision linked to the MPCC’s rules. … UCI gave authorization for the treatment, I could race according to UCI rules, but my team is a member of MPCC. I understand it and we all must accept this situation without regrets.”

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Lampre pulls Horner out of Vuelta for conflict with MPCC http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/lampre-pulls-horner-out-of-vuelta-for-conflict-with-mpcc_342072 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/lampre-pulls-horner-out-of-vuelta-for-conflict-with-mpcc_342072#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 09:42:41 +0000 VeloNews.com http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342072

Chris Horner will not defend his title at the Vuelta a Espana, the Spanish grand tour that begins Saturday. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

Treatment for bronchitis lowers Horner’s cortisol levels and Lampre decides to replace him on the roster despite obtaining a TUE

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Chris Horner will not defend his title at the Vuelta a Espana, the Spanish grand tour that begins Saturday. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

Lampre-Merida has pulled Chris Horner out of its Vuelta a Espana lineup due to a conflict with the Movement For Credible Cycling (MPCC).

Horner, who was treated with cortisone after suffering from bronchitis during the Tour de France, acquired a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) from the UCI and was given the all-clear to race the Vuelta, which starts Saturday, and try to defend his 2013 title.

Lampre, however, is a member of the MPCC and when it became known that Horner’s cortisol levels were lower than the minimum, the team took Horner out of its Vuelta roster on a “complete voluntary decision,” it said in a statement. Italian Valerio Conti will take Horner’s place on the roster.

Dr. Carlo Guardascione, Lampre’s team doctor, explained the situation in further detail in a press release: “After the finish of the Tour de France and after the Tour of Utah, where the athlete was still suffering from bronchitis, Chris Horner underwent two examinations by two specialists for his bronchitis … both specialists agreed that a treatment of cortisone by oral means was the only way to resolve this problem. All the necessary steps were taken to request a TUE, this authorization was given by UCI commission for the athlete to proceed with this therapy on [August 15].

“Physiologically, this treatment can cause a lowering of the cortisol together with other factors such as jet lag after his travel from United States, where he had a time difference of 9 hours.

“After the necessary UCI blood tests were taken, it showed a lower cortisol level compared to the minimum level requested by the MPCC, thus the decision from the team to not allow the athlete to partake in this Vuelta even with having all the necessary UCI authorization in order.”

Said Horner: “Of course I’m sad about this news. I was willing to try to defend the 2013 title. [The] Vuelta was my main target in the season, the team signed me with the aim of being competitive in the Spanish race, but I accept the decision linked to the MPCC’s rules. This bad bronchitis caused me a lot of problems, I’ve been suffering from it for weeks and this treatment could have allowed me to solve the problem.

“UCI gave authorization for the treatment, I could race according to UCI rules, but my team is a member of MPCC. I understand it and we all must accept this situation without regrets.”

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Voigt’s final hurrah: Not on top, but does it really matter? http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/voigts-final-hurrah-top-really-matter_342063 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/voigts-final-hurrah-top-really-matter_342063#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 00:51:38 +0000 Neal Rogers http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342063

Voigt was met with more applause on the podium than the stage winner or the race leader. Photo by Casey B. Gibson.

In the end, it didn’t matter if Jens Voigt had won or lost in Colorado Springs. He'd put on a show, one last time

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Voigt was met with more applause on the podium than the stage winner or the race leader. Photo by Casey B. Gibson.

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colorado (VN) — In the end, it really didn’t matter if he’d won or lost.

Jens Voigt, the 42-year-old German whose career has spanned two decades, was off the front, alone, battling against the wind, the peloton, and his own inner demons, one last time.

In his final race, in what has been a season-long farewell tour, the fan favorite from Trek Factory Racing was doing what he’s done best since the Clinton administration — suffering, tempting fate, attempting to defy the odds.

After making it into the day’s 12-rider breakaway, Voigt attacked with 40km remaining on stage 4 of the USA Pro Challenge in Colorado Springs Thursday, on the third of four 25km circuits that included a steep climb leading into the red-rock wonderland of the Garden of the Gods, followed by as a short kicker 2km from the finish line.

Voigt’s advantage was never more than 90 seconds over his former breakaway companions, but topped out at a good three minutes back to the main peloton, which consisted of an odd mix of motivated sprint teams and GC contenders.

Teams that missed the move, such as Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies and Garmin-Sharp, chased early, while teams with top sprinters, such as SmartStop, Hincapie Sportswear, and Cannondale, drove the effort late, despite the efforts of Voigt’s Trek teammates to slow the chase at the front.

On a day that wasn’t expected to impact the general classification, there was little question as to what the thousands of fans along the course hoped to see. Signs proclaiming Voigt’s catchphrase, “Shut Up Legs!” were abundant. T-shirts reading “Jens! Jens! Jens!” lined the finishing straight. Voigt had won a race at least once in every one of his 16 years as a pro, and had been winless, up to this point, in 2014. Twitter was ablaze with support for the old man who could, the hard-working father of six; there was a nearly universal desire to see the cagey, charismatic Voigt go out on top.

Within the final 10 kilometers, it was anyone’s guess as to whether the veteran breakaway specialist would hold off the hard-charging pack. The gap had fallen to one minute, and it was coming down quickly.

With 5km to go, the gap was 35 seconds. With 2km to go, and one short, steep climb remaining, the gap was under 20 seconds. Would he hold it, and win one last time? Or would he be absorbed by an unsentimental peloton? And in the end, did it matter?

Voigt’s performance, a month out from his 43rd birthday, had already been a victory of sorts. The oldest rider in the pro peloton had, once again, put on a show. He’d brought the drama. He’d given it everything, against all odds, alone, again. He’d accomplished what he’d set out to, what he’d said was his main objective coming into the race, when he hoped only to have the opportunity to “try one of my stupid breakaways one last time.”

In the end, Voigt was caught inside the final kilometer, steamrolled by hungry, younger bike racers looking to create their own legacies. Cannondale’s Elia Viviani won the stage ahead of Martin Kohler (BMC Racing). Voigt finished 67th, 52 seconds down, completely spent.

Yet during the podium celebration, where Voigt was awarded as the stage’s most aggressive rider, the cheers were, by far, the loudest of the day.

With a hard mountain stage looming on Friday (Voigt said he’d likely hide in the peloton and recover), an uphill time trial on Saturday, and a likely field sprint on Sunday, Voigt had taken his final opportunity, and he’d given his all. And in that sense, he’d gone out on top.

After the stage, VeloNews asked Voigt if — even though he hadn’t taken the stage win — he had been able to soak up the experience of one final, odds-defying breakaway, and if that wasn’t a victory in itself.

Voigt’s response was, like the man himself — energetic, entertaining, and filled with emotion.

“Despite the fact that I was hurting, yes, I was also soaking it up,” he said. “I saw all the signs on the roads — ‘Shut up legs,’ and ‘Farewell, Jens.’ I could hear the people on the road, the fans. And it felt like it was my home crowd. I wanted it like that, one more time in the last week of my career. I felt obliged to show it one more time, to try to win in the fashion they would expect.

‘Maybe, in a bizarre way, it was fitting it ended like this,” he continued. “This is the story of my life — from 20, 30, even 40 breakaways, maybe one works. This was the typical breakaway, you give it all, and you get caught. It was a perfect example of my career — you put it all on the line, you’re taking risks in looking stupid.

“I like today. It was a good day, and I’m really happy that I had it. To be honest, I was a little emotional on the podium. I think I had maybe more applause than the yellow jersey, and I was the closest to crying since the birth of my first child, 19 years ago. I was really close to having tears in my eyes. It was a beautiful and emotional moment for me, and I am happy to one more time be on the podium, with these other amazing riders. I’m happy. I feel like I accomplished something, in my last race. It was a success. I was operational today. I was a force to reckon with. I made it hard for those guys to chase me down, and they only caught me with 800 meters to go.”

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Results: 2014 USA Pro Challenge, stage 4 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/race-results/results-2014-usa-pro-challenge-stage-4_342053 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/race-results/results-2014-usa-pro-challenge-stage-4_342053#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 23:15:17 +0000 VeloNews.com http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342053

Elia Viviani wins the sprint in downtown Colorado Springs. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

The sprinters spoil Jens Voigt's party, but Elia Viviani wins his first stage of the 2014 USA Pro Challenge

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Elia Viviani wins the sprint in downtown Colorado Springs. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

  • 1. Elia Viviani, Cannondale, in 2:28:52
  • 2. Martin Kohler, BMC Racing Team
  • 3. Serghei Tvetcov, Jelly Belly
  • 4. Tyler Magner, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 5. Kiel Reijnen, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 6. Jure Kocjan, Team SmartStop
  • 7. Alex Howes, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 8. Jonathan Cantwell, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 9. Brent Bookwalter, BMC Racing Team
  • 10. Ryan Anderson, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 11. Jacob Rathe, Jelly Belly
  • 12. Rasmus Guldhammer, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 13. Zachary Bell, Team SmartStop
  • 14. Joseph Rosskopf, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 15. Tanner Putt, Bissell Development Team
  • 16. Bartosz Huzarski, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 17. Michael Schär, BMC Racing Team
  • 18. Daniel Alexander Jaramillo Diez, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 19. Gavin Mannion, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 20. Rafal Majka, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 21. Tejay van Garderen, BMC Racing Team
  • 22. Ben Hermans, BMC Racing Team
  • 23. Tom Moses, Rapha Condor Jlt
  • 24. Clement Chevrier, Bissell Development Team
  • 25. Bruno Pires, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 26. Dion Smith, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 27. Benjamin King, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 28. Carter Jones, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 29. Ian Crane, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 30. Pawel Poljanski, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 31. Bernard Sulzberger, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 32. Thomas Danielson, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 33. Matthew Busche, Trek Factory Racing
  • 34. Peter Stetina, BMC Racing Team
  • 35. Jose Joao Pimenta Costa Mendes, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 36. Cameron Wurf, Cannondale
  • 37. Tiago Machado, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 38. Patrick Konrad, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 39. Javier Megias Leal, Team Novo Nordisk
  • 40. Markel Irizar Aranburu, Trek Factory Racing
  • 41. Robbie Squire, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 42. Frank Schleck, Trek Factory Racing
  • 43. Thomas Dekker, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 44. Richard Handley, Rapha Condor Jlt
  • 45. Jai Crawford, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 46. Julian Kyer, Team SmartStop
  • 47. Riccardo Zoidl, Trek Factory Racing
  • 48. Michael Cuming, Rapha Condor Jlt
  • 49. James Oram, Bissell Development Team
  • 50. David de la Cruz Melgarejo, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 51. Ruben Zepuntke, Bissell Development Team
  • 52. Gregory Daniel, Bissell Development Team
  • 53. Daniel Eaton, Bissell Development Team
  • 54. Robin Carpenter, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 55. Jordan Kerby, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 56. Chris Butler, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 57. Lucas Euser, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 58. Jesse Anthony, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 59. Kirk Carlsen, Jelly Belly
  • 60. Travis McCabe, Team SmartStop
  • 61. Eric Marcotte, Team SmartStop, at :00:23
  • 62. Edward Beltran Suarez, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 63. Lachlan Norris, Drapac Professional Cycling, at :00:25
  • 64. Laurent Didier, Trek Factory Racing, at :00:27
  • 65. Darren Lapthorne, Drapac Professional Cycling, at :00:38
  • 66. Alan Marangoni, Cannondale, at :00:50
  • 67. Jens Voigt, Trek Factory Racing, at :00:52
  • 68. Oscar Clark, Hincapie Sportswear Development, at :01:33
  • 69. Tom Zirbel, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies, at :01:59
  • 70. Michael Torckler, Team SmartStop
  • 71. Ian Burnett, Jelly Belly, at :06:01
  • 72. Leopold König, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 73. Scott Ambrose, Team Novo Nordisk
  • 74. Kristian House, Rapha Condor Jlt
  • 75. Wesley Sulzberger, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 76. Edward King, Cannondale
  • 77. Michael Rogers, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 78. Hayden Roulston, Trek Factory Racing
  • 79. Calvin Watson, Trek Factory Racing
  • 80. Bjorn Selander, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 81. Luis Enrique Davila, Jelly Belly
  • 82. Rob Britton, Team SmartStop
  • 83. Rick Zabel, BMC Racing Team
  • 84. Ivan Basso, Cannondale
  • 85. Cristiano Salerno, Cannondale
  • 86. Michel Koch, Cannondale
  • 87. Matej Mohoric, Cannondale
  • 88. Joonas Henttala, Team Novo Nordisk
  • 89. David Lozano Riba, Team Novo Nordisk
  • 90. Gregor Muhlberger, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 91. Jesper Hansen, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 92. Elliott Porter, Rapha Condor Jlt
  • 93. Yannick Eijssen, BMC Racing Team
  • 94. Steve Fisher, Jelly Belly
  • 95. Adam Phelan, Drapac Professional Cycling
  • 96. Caleb Fairly, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 97. Keegan Swirbul, Bissell Development Team
  • 98. Janier Alexis Acevedo Colle, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 99. Phillip Gaimon, Team Garmin-Sharp
  • 100. Michael Mørkøv, Tinkoff-Saxo
  • 101. Jeffry Louder, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 102. Joseph Lewis, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 103. Hugh Carthy, Rapha Condor Jlt
  • 104. Christopher Jones, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 105. Johnathan Freter, Jelly Belly
  • 106. Stephen Leece, Jamis-Hagens Berman, at :06:15
  • 107. Michael Schwarzmann, Team Netapp-Endura
  • 108. Martijn Verschoor, Team Novo Nordisk
  • 109. Mike Friedman, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 110. Charles Planet, Team Novo Nordisk
  • 111. Alexander Candelario, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 112. Daniel Summerhill, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 113. Luis Romero Amaran, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 114. Carson Miller, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 115. Jonathan Clarke, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 116. Benjamin Day, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling
  • 117. Aaron Perry, Team Novo Nordisk
  • 118. Ben Jacques-Maynes, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 119. Scott Zwizanski, Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies
  • 120. Matt Cooke, Jamis-Hagens Berman
  • 121. Toms Skujins, Hincapie Sportswear Development
  • 122. Nathan Van Hooydonck, Bissell Development Team
  • OTL Isaac Bolivar Hernandez, UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling, at :13:06

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Viviani wins Pro Challenge stage 4, thwarting Voigt’s solo heroics http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/viviani-wins-pro-challenge-stage-4-thwarting-voigts-solo-heroics_342023 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/viviani-wins-pro-challenge-stage-4-thwarting-voigts-solo-heroics_342023#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 22:07:07 +0000 Spencer Powlison http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342023

Elia Viviani wins the sprint in downtown Colorado Springs. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Jens Voigt rocked the Garden of the Gods with a 27-mile solo attack — nearly long enough for the 42-year-old to survive for a win

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Elia Viviani wins the sprint in downtown Colorado Springs. Photo: Casey B. Gibson | www.cbgphoto.com

Cannondale’s Elia Viviani sprinted to victory in Colorado Springs in stage 4 of the USA Pro Challenge.

But that wasn’t the day’s big story. Instead, aging breakaway artist Jens Voigt (Trek Factory Racing) stole the spotlight with a 27-mile solo attack that lasted nearly long enough for him to survive for a win.

As the peloton waffled in their efforts to chase the 42-year-old leader, the gap grew.

After the final circuit in the Garden of the Gods, it looked like Voigt might have hung on to win a stage in his farewell race.

The gap slowly began to drop from 1:25, to down below one minute, to 20 seconds with a couple miles remaining. But as Voigt tackled the rise before the final kilometer, the peloton had him in its grasp.

The lone leader was overtaken in the last kilometer of racing, Viviani showed his sprinting class, taking his first major win since June’s Tour of Slovenia.

“Oh it’s difficult to close with Jens,” said Viviani. “He’s a strong man, he’s a legend man. It’s ever difficult to close [him down when he is away].”

“[It was] not disappointing, I was just ‘dammit it didn’t work,’” said Voigt. “I mean okay on the last climb, yeah I lost time on the last climb because they were fresh … I was just trying to hang on I had a minute on top and I thought it maybe was 50-50. … Once you start out there you might as well go to the end.”

Stage 4 photo gallery.

Another big break goes early

A breakaway of 12 riders made their move only moments after the stage officially began.

Their gap grew as large as four minutes.

Along the way, Ben Jacques-Maynes (Jamis-Hagens Berman) reclaimed the king of the mountains (KOM) jersey, winning three intermediate climbs in the Garden of the Gods.

As for the intermediate sprints, UnitedHealthcare’s Danny Summerhill took charge. A fixture in this Pro Challenge’s breakaways, the Coloradan earned maximum points on the first and second trips through Colorado Springs. With that, he momentarily surpassed his teammate Kiel Reijnen, who led the green jersey competition at the start of the day.

Heading into the final half of the race, a combination of Garmin-Sharp and UnitedHealthcare rode at the front of the peloton to keep the gap manageable, around 2:20.

With 27 miles to go, just before the third KOM sprint, Voigt counterattacked after his teammate Laurent Didier made a move that was brought back by the chase. Jacques-Maynes followed Voigt, won the KOM sprint, then drifted back to the chasers, who were about 20 seconds behind.

Voigt pressed on alone through the punchy, curvy roads in the Garden of the Gods.

A nail-biting pursuit

With 20 miles to go, the 42-year-old had a one minute gap over the chase group. The peloton was 2:45 behind the lead.

The field caught the remainder of the chase with about 11 miles to go, at the base of the steep climb up Ridge Road to the KOM line. At that point, Voigt’s lead had fallen to 1:25.

Robbie Squire attacked the field after the KOM, with 9.5 miles to go. But he only dangled off the front, eventually being brought back by a peloton driven by Tinkoff-Saxo, Garmin-Sharp, and Cannondale.

With around five miles left, Fränk Schleck and Laurent Didier moved to the front, disrupting the chase for their teammate in the lead. The gap was 55 seconds.

BMC moved to the front in the final miles, likely protecting Tejay van Garderen from danger.

However, most of the pacemaking was left to Cannondale in the finale.

For a few minutes, in the closing miles, it looked like Voigt would pull it off.

His gap dropped, but eventually it held steady around 20 seconds

On the final rise into the right-hand bend that introduced the last kilometer of racing, the peloton had the leader in its sights.

With 750 meters left, the peloton pushed past the intrepid German, led by SmartStop.

The sprint’s impetus came from a leadout by Hincapie Sportswear Development’s Tyler Magner. Elia Viviani (Cannondale) was tight on his wheel and made a decisive jump, not to be challenged as he rode to his first win at this year’s USA Pro Challenge.

“After these three stages … it’s very difficult with the altitude,” said Viviani. “The first stage we worked all day, and we got nothing. Today, we did the perfect tactic, and in the last lap made strong work for the first victory for Cannondale.

“This is the last race for Jens, but I think he is the same as a young rider, same as a first [year] pro rider. Always he [is] the dangerous man. … Every day he go to the breakaway and attack. I [am] proud for Jens.”

Voigt was not altogether dejected on the line. He was pleased with his effort, and willing to put a positive spin on the ill-fated breakaway.

“You put it all on the line, you roll the dice, and it works or it doesn’t work,” said Voigt. “I can’t complain.

“I was trying to win it in my way. Other teams try to win it in their way. That’s just how it turns out in the end.

“I don’t think I did a mistake, or I could have done anything better. I took as many risks as I could downhill. I was working as hard as I could on the flats and the climbs.”

Martin Kohler (BMC) finished second, and Serghei Tvetcov (Jelly Belly) sprinted to third, a surprising result from a rider who rode to the same placing in Wednesday’s mountain stage.

The GC standings remained unchanged, with van Garderen holding his lead over Rafal Majka (Tinkoff-Saxo) and Ben Hermans (BMC).

Even the young race leader saw Voigt as the sentimental favorite. “I was pulling for [Voigt],” said van Garderen. “I was hoping he’d stay out there. But the sprinters teams, they don’t have many chances in this race, so they were pretty keen on getting him back, but I was rooting for him.”

Reijnen kept the green jersey with a fifth-place finish, nudging past teammate Summerhill on points. “I gotta be honest, I’m impressed Viviani was able to hang on,” Reijnen said. “It was kind of a grueling day. … Maybe he was a little fresher than some of us. It was always going to be tough to beat him [today].”

Friday’s stage 5 will take the riders on a 104-mile ride from Woodland Park to Breckenridge.

Full stage 4 results.

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Video: Top 10 riders to watch at the Vuelta http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/video/video-top-10-riders-watch-vuelta_342013 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/video/video-top-10-riders-watch-vuelta_342013#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 18:18:47 +0000 VeloNews.com http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=342013

Global Cycling Network previews the top-10 riders to watch at the 2014 Vuelta.

This year's Vuelta a España has a stacked field, and here are 10 GC riders that should impress in Spain

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Global Cycling Network previews the top-10 riders to watch at the 2014 Vuelta.

Editor’s Note: This video is courtesy of Global Cycling Network. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily represent the opinions of VeloNews.com, Velo magazine or the editors and staff of Competitor Group, Inc.

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Cannondale-Slipstream merger a reflection of Italy’s economic woes http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/cannondale-slipstream-merger-a-reflection-of-italys-economic-woes_341987 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/news/cannondale-slipstream-merger-a-reflection-of-italys-economic-woes_341987#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 15:09:22 +0000 Gregor Brown http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=341987

Cannondale will merge with Slipstream Sports after this season, which will leave just one UCI ProTeam registered in Italy. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

The squad's 2015 merger with Slipstream Sports indicates how far Italian cycling has fallen from its glory days

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Cannondale will merge with Slipstream Sports after this season, which will leave just one UCI ProTeam registered in Italy. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

MILAN (VN) — The closure of Cannondale/Liquigas after 10 years reflects the current economic plight in Italy. The squad’s general manager Roberto Amadio explained simply that the situation in Italy does not support first division teams.

“This is a refection on the Italian economy,” Amadio told VeloNews.

“It’s a hard time for all the Italian companies, above all for sport. Cycling lives only on sponsorship, and this is a reflection on the economics and politics in Italy. Nothing more.”

On Wednesday, Garmin-Sharp CEO Jonathan Vaughters announced that his team will lose its title sponsor for next year but will welcome Cannondale to the mix. The American bike company (Cannondale is owned by a Canadian company, Dorel Industries — Ed.) has been sponsoring Italy’s top team for four years but with the merger of the teams, it will now back Vaughters’ outfit as its bike and title sponsor through 2017.

Slipstream Sports, the American sports management group behind the current iteration of Garmin-Sharp, has yet to confirm which riders or staff from the 2014 Cannondale squad it will take on board. Vaughters, however, said he will offer to keep all eight riders with existing Cannondale contracts, a list that includes Moreno Moser and under-23 world champion Matej Mohoric. Davide Formolo already confirmed he would join Slipstream’s 2015 team.

The 2014 version of Cannondale consists of 69 people — 28 riders, 12 soigneurs, 10 mechanics, six sport directors, three doctors and coaches, two drivers, and one team manager, cook, secretary, press officer, and hospitality manager.

Amadio began his team with Italian sponsor Liquigas in earnest in 2005. Cannondale joined as a bike supplier and took over the license of the team in 2013. Along the way, the 51-year-old Italian guided the team to three grand tour wins and three green jerseys at the Tour de France.

Ivan Basso, who won the Giro d’Italia for the team in 2010 and also won the race in 2006, and Peter Sagan have already signed contacts to join Tinkoff-Saxo next season.

“I’m sad to see these riders go, for sure,” Amadio said. “In 10 years, I’ve created good teams with good young talents, from Roman Kreuziger to Vincenzo Nibali, Peter Sagan to Daniel Oss, Manuel Quinziato to Ivan Santaromita … They were all my riders.

“The current crop includes Formolo, Moser, and Mohoric … For sure, I’m sad to see them go, but that’s how cycling goes. I’m sure they’ll do well, they are great riders.”

Amadio said Cannondale is leaving behind one of cycling’s prized, 18 first-division licenses in the process. He has no intentions to find a new sponsor and continue the team. He will instead ride out the 2014 season — he is now in Spain with Sagan for the Vuelta a España — before deciding his next move.

“It’s too early to say what everyone’s going to do,” added Amadio. “The team is trying to organize itself, the mechanics, the masseurs and the staff. We’ll have to see in this period if they are able to find work. They are all great people, so I think that most of them will be able to find a solution.”

Times are tough, however, in Italy. Earlier in August, the nation’s economy slid back into a recession for a third time since 2008, with national public debt still hovering at 2 trillion euros ($2.65 trillion). Without Cannondale in Italy, only Lampre-Merida remains the country’s only first division team for 2015.

“Italy has the riders, resources and directors who are smart, capable and able to build great team. When the economy returns to a good level in Italy, the big teams will return, as well,” Amadio said. “I’m afraid we’re going to have to wait a few years before that happens.”

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What’s inside the September issue of Velo magazine http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/magazine/whats-inside-september-issue-velo-magazine_341860 http://velonews.competitor.com/2014/08/magazine/whats-inside-september-issue-velo-magazine_341860#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 14:52:04 +0000 Chris Case http://velonews.competitor.com/?p=341860

The September issue of Velo provides complete coverage of the 2014 Tour de France.

September is the Tour de France edition, and it is combined with the official guide to the USA Pro Challenge

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The September issue of Velo provides complete coverage of the 2014 Tour de France.

006_VeloSep044_VeloSep 066_VeloSepThe most anticipated Velo issue of the year is here. The Tour de France edition, with all the race analysis and tech features Velo readers have come to expect, is combined with the official guide to the USA Pro Challenge.

This double September issue contains everything you need to know about the world’s biggest bike race, which started in Great Britain and was full of drama, crashes, surprises, and a dominant performance by Italy’s Vincenzo Nibali.

Velo takes you week-by-week through the Grand Boucle, beginning with Nibali’s perfect ride. From the cobbles of stage 5 that saw Chris Froome abandon the race, to the Alberto Contador’s crash and the epic ride of Tony Martin in the first half of the race, our reporters were on the ground to capture all of the action.

Though the Tour started in Britain, the British riders did not fare well, with star sprinter Mark Cavendish crashing out on stage 1 and five-star favorite Froome suffering through a series of crashes.

Marcel Kittel claimed his rightful spot atop the sprinting throne for the second consecutive year in France, and his coronation is highlighted in the issue.

On the tech side, the Tour is often used as a showcase for new and improved equipment, and this year was no exception. Read all about the latest, most technologically advanced equipment to debut in the pro peloton.

The second half of the Tour was no less dramatic, as the rise of several French riders took center stage throughout the final stages. American hopeful Tejay van Garderen struggled, then persevered to preserve a top-5 finish in Paris. Read all about his rocky road.

The Garmin-Sharp team also saw emotional, mixed fates, from Andrew Talansky’s solo ride to beat the time cut, to Jack Bauer’s agonizing defeat at the line.

Finally, the mighty Peter Sagan had an interesting July, without a victory, but a dominant display of control in the green jersey competition.

Outside of France, our tech team took a look at new carbon clinchers, reviewing eight of the best on the market. While they used to turn heads for the all the wrong reasons, these wheelsets prove that the technology is ready for primetime.

When you’ve reached the end of Velo’s Tour coverage, flip the magazine over and treat yourself to the official USA Pro Challenge guide. Read detailed descriptions of each of the race’s seven stages and 16 teams, an in-depth analysis of seven riders to watch, a page of helpful tips for fans new to bike racing, and information on the “must-see moments” that could determine overall contenders. Racing in Colorado’s mountains presents challenges all its own: discover how the altitude will affect rider performance and find out why all pros carry a “rain bag” in their team car for the inevitable bad-weather racing day.

All this and much more, in the September issue of Velo.

Subscribe now to receive Velo magazine every month.

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