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Kristin Armstrong

Kristin Armstrong (Boise, Idaho)

Women’s Road Race, Time Trial
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Kristin Armstrong was a world-class triathlete before she was ever known as a top cyclist. She raced professionally, competing in the Ironman World Championships in 1999. Her career in that sport was cut short, however, by osteoarthritis of her hips. Unable to run, she turned to cycling and by 2003, four years after her debut at Kona, she was one of the top cyclists in America.

Armstrong was born in 1973 and grew up in Tennessee and California. The daughter of military parents, she spent her high school years in Japan before returning to Idaho to study exercise physiology.

In 2004, she placed eighth in her first-ever Olympic road race in Athens. She showed her real strength in the time trial in 2008, winning the gold medal in Beijing. After becoming world champion in the time trial the following year, Armstrong took what turned out to be a hiatus from the sport. In the fall of 2010, after giving birth to a son, Lucas, she announced her return to cycling.

Armstrong was director of her Peanut Butter & Co.-Twenty12 trade team during her pregnancy, and now captains the squad, which is now backed by Exergy Development Group. She also co-owns K-Edge Cycling Solutions, best known for manufacturing the chain catchers found on most pro bikes.

Armstrong made news in 2011 when Amber Neben won an appeal with USA Cycling to replace the Olympic champ in the world championship time trial. Armstrong had won the Tour of California women’s time trial in May, but had struggled much of the season. Armstrong returned home immediately from Denmark when she landed for worlds and set about preparing for a 2012 that has proven worlds better for her competitively.

Armstrong finished second to Judith Arndt in the Tour of Flanders World Cup and won a stage of the Energiewacht Tour in the Netherlands, but suffered a fractured collarbone in a prologue crash at her hometown Exergy Tour in May. She was leading on the road at the time. Armstrong returned to racing in July, winning the first three stages of the Cascade Classic before leaving for London.